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VIDEO: Don't try this at home -- airplane tows skier

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 20:07
VIDEO: Don't try this at home -- airplane tows skier

In a video making the rounds on the web, skier Reese Hanneman is towed behind an Aviat Husky aircraft through a snowfield. But is it legal?

April 15, 2014

VIDEO: Special Olympics powerlifters demonstrate heart, strength

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 19:50
VIDEO: Special Olympics powerlifters demonstrate heart, strength

At any given day at Southside Gym in Anchorage, Alaskan powerlifters who compete in the Special Olympics can be found working out, trash-talking and joking around. 

April 15, 2014

Longtime Anchorage attorney faces lawsuit over lease, relationship agreement

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 19:44
Longtime Anchorage attorney faces lawsuit over lease, relationship agreement A woman claims that long-time Anchorage attorney Peter Walton breached a contract when his family reclaimed property that he had leased to her for 60 years. The two had allegedly made an agreement that Walton would provide Mia Tan with housing in return for companionship for the rest of his life.April 15, 2014

Initiative group wants Alaskans to vote against marijuana legalization effort

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 19:36
Initiative group wants Alaskans to vote against marijuana legalization effort A handful of Alaskans are looking to make sure a ballot initiative that would legalize marijuana in Alaska doesn't come to pass.April 15, 2014

Anchorage Assembly shifts left, elects new leadership

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 19:25
Anchorage Assembly shifts left, elects new leadership The first order of business for the Anchorage Assembly after the April 1 election was to elect a new chair and vice-chair.April 15, 2014

Senate candidate Sullivan talks health care — and dolphins

Southeast Alaska News - Tue, 2014-04-15 18:44

Republican Dan Sullivan, with his wife Julie Fate Sullivan, at the Sitka Westmark on April 12. Sullivan hopes to challenge incumbent U.S. Senator Mark Begich. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)

Republican Senate candidate Dan Sullivan was in Sitka this weekend to speak at the Sitka Republican Women’s annual Lincoln Day Dinner. Sullivan, a former Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources, is hoping to challenge incumbent Democrat Mark Begich, who is up for reelection this fall. Sullivan faces several Republican rivals for the GOP nomination, including Lt. Governor Mead Treadwell, and the 2010 Tea Party champion, Joe Miller.

Sullivan sat down with Sitka reporters to talk about his role in challenging President Obama’s healthcare law, the perils of over-regulation – and that time he swam against the Navy’s military dolphins.

Listen to iFriendly audio.

The first time Sullivan visited Sitka, over a decade ago, it was in a very different role.

“We were the guys swimming against the dolphins,” Sullivan said.

That would be military-trained Navy dolphins. Sullivan has been an officer and reservist in the U.S. Marine Corps since 1993.  He first came to Sitka as part of Northern Edge 2000, an elaborate military training exercise that many Sitkans remember, in part, for the Navy dolphins that were temporarily housed in town.

The dolphins were trained to find enemy swimmers who might be, say, planting mines on a naval ship. During the exercise, Sullivan and his marines played those swimmers — which is how he found himself in a dry suit in Sitka Sound, with dolphins swimming towards him. Then, suddenly, those dolphins stopped.

SULLIVAN: So we thought that was very strange. And then we were left, unfortunately, this marine and I were left in the water for quite a long time, like about an hour. It was cold. And finally they came to pick us up and I said, what, why did you guys leave us here for so long? What happened? And the dolphins didn’t do their job, they stopped. He said, we had to get the dolphins out of the water very quickly. We’re really sorry. There was kind of an emergency. We said what? And he said, well somebody noticed that they thought they saw a pod of killer whales, so we had to collect the dolphins real quick. And I said, you left me out here and my marine for over an hour, when there was a pod of killer whales?! And the guy looked at me, and literally he said, he goes, look, I’m sorry. He goes, we spend millions of dollars training those dolphins. [[Laughter]]

Sullivan served most recently as Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources under Governor Sean Parnell; he resigned last fall, to launch his campaign. Before that, he served as Alaska Attorney General for a year and a half under then-Governor Sarah Palin.

During that time, Sullivan was one of the state attorneys general who sued the Obama administration over the president’s healthcare law.

“When that was passed, I grabbed a small group of attorneys, and I said, hey, before we decide whether or not we’re going to challenge this, let’s figure out what it is. Let’s read it!” Sullivan said. “I’m not going to say I read every word. It’s a big, thick document. But we spent weeks –weeks! — reviewing that law.”

Sullivan ended up recommending the State of Alaska join the suit, arguing that the law was unconstitutional.

In the end, the Supreme Court upheld most of the law, but Sullivan said he’s proud that the Court accepted one argument at the heart of the suit — that the federal government could not force states to expand Medicaid, the healthcare program for the poor. Medicaid expansion became optional, and this fall, Governor Parnell announced that Alaska would opt out, citing its cost.

Sullivan said he supports the governor’s decision, and continues to oppose the law, which he argues has done more harm than good.

“Are there elements of that bill, for example preexisting conditions, that I think are positive – yes,” Sullivan said.  ”But [look at] the overall direction of what that has done and how that has harmed Alaskans.”

Democrats argue that popular elements of the bill – like banning discrimination based on preexisting conditions – depend on the less popular elements, like the mandate that everyone carry health insurance and subsidies for those who can’t afford it.

During the interview, Sullivan aimed much of his fire at President Barack Obama. He said he believes the President’s policies are stifling the economy.

“It’s over-regulating almost all elements of our economy, whether it’s resource development, whether it’s the financial community, whether it’s tourism,” Sullivan said. “Which is hindering opportunity in Alaska and the country.”

Sullivan said that, if elected, his top two economic priorities would be reducing overregulation, and increasing energy development.

Those are both issues Sullivan dealt with at the state level. As Commissioner of Natural Resources, he pushed forward HB77, a controversial bill aimed at streamlining the Department’s permitting process. Opponents argued that the bill limited public participation, and it was shelved by the legislature earlier this spring.

But Sullivan said he thought the overall effort had been on the right track, citing the backlog of permits at the agency when he arrived.

“Two thousand five hundred backlogged permits that we were sitting on as a state – just at one agency!” Sullivan said. “Some had been sitting around two, three, four years! And to me again, this was an issue that was very, very harmful to small businesses in Alaska – growing the economy, employing people.”

Before his time as attorney general, Sullivan worked in various roles in the Bush administration and U.S. military. He served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of State under Condoleezza Rice from 2006 to 2009. From 2002 to 2004, he served on the staff of the White House National Security Council. In between, he spent two years on active duty as a staff officer to General John Abizaid, who was then overseeing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Sullivan said his experience in the military put veterans’ issues at the top of his agenda.

“There are areas, with regard to wasteful military spending, that we clearly can make some important cuts,” he said. “However, spending on our veterans should not be an area where we try to balance the budget. Balancing the budget on the backs of our veterans, and the benefits they’ve earned, is not where I would be, in terms of being a U.S. Senator.”

Sullivan has taken heat for his years in Washington from outside groups supporting Senator Mark Begich, who have run ads arguing that Sullivan hasn’t spent enough time in Alaska.

Sullivan is originally from Ohio, where his family runs the publicly traded company RPM International, and is prominent in Republican politics. He moved to Alaska in 1997.

Sullivan’s wife, Julie Fate Sullivan, is the daughter of longtime Native leader Mary Jane Fate. Sullivan’s father-in-law, Hugh Fate, represented Fairbanks as a Republican state legislator in the early 2000s.

The Senate primary will be held on August 19. The General Election will be November 4, 2014.

Alaska Gov. Parnell commits to candidate debates around the state

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 18:02
Alaska Gov. Parnell commits to candidate debates around the state Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell has committed to a series of gubernatorial candidate debates and forums in the lead-up to the primary and general elections.April 15, 2014

Alaska News Nightly: April 15, 2014

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:55

Individual news stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via emailpodcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn.

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Legislature Passes Bill On AGDC Appointment

The Associated Press

The Alaska Legislature has passed a measure allowing out-of-state residents to serve on the board of a corporation that could play a key role in a major liquefied natural gas pipeline project.

The Senate’s 13-7 vote helps clear the way for Richard Rabinow, a former pipeline company executive from Texas, to serve on the board of the Alaska Gasline Development Corp.

Governor Sean Parnell appointed Rabinow last September and has defended the appointment as falling within his discretion under the constitution. Rabinow faces confirmation Thursday.

Supporters of the bill, including House Speaker Mike Chenault, have said it was an oversight to not explicitly allow for out-of-state residents to serve on the board. They say they want the best people possible to serve.

Opponents say Alaskans should make policy decisions for Alaskans.

Legislature Considers $150m to Help Refineries

Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington DC

The Flint Hills refinery in North Pole plans to cease operation this spring, and the Parnell Administration warns Petro Star’s refinery in North Pole might be next. A bill crafted by the Administration would prop up Alaska’s three remaining oil refineries with $150 million in state funds. But, even some legislators who are helping advance the bill say they’re uncomfortable with the loose terms of the giveaway.

Nikiski LNG Plant May Reopen Soon

Aaron Selbig, KBBI – Homer

The ConocoPhillips LNG plant in Nikiski may be re-opening soon, thanks to a boost from the federal government. The Department of Energy announced Monday that it has approved a request from the company to resume LNG exports to Japan.

Yukon Fishermen Prepare For Summer Of Conservation

Ben Matheson, KYUK – Bethel

Fishers on the Kuskokwim River are expecting unprecedented restrictions to bring more king salmon to spawning grounds.  On the Yukon River, fisherman can expect a similar set of restrictions.

Some Southeast Chinook Runs Expected To Be Strong

Joe Viechnicki, KFSK – Petersburg

King Salmon are expected to be plentiful in parts of Southeast Alaska this summer.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game this month announced a king salmon harvest quota allowed under the Pacific Salmon Treaty and based on the forecasts of Chinook returning to rivers and streams on the Pacific coast of the U.S. and Canada.

MEA Official Accuses Anchorage Assembly Of Misusing City Funds

Ellen Lockyer, KSKA – Anchorage

A Matanuska Electric Association official charges that the Anchorage Municipal Assembly is spending city funds on private interests.  Joe Griffith, MEA’s executive director, has contacted Anchorage officials  with concerns that city money is being spent on one Assemblyman’s legal fight against a power station upgrade.

Haines Residents Pursue Railroad Link

Margaret Friedenauer, KHNS – Haines

Some residents in Haines are pursing the dream of a railroad that may one day link the community to Interior Alaska, Yukon mines and to a future port facility. The state and other stakeholders aren’t dismissing the idea outright.

Group Uses National Water Dance To Raise Compassion

Johanna Eurich, APRN Contributor

A small group of people gathered Saturday in Anchorage to use art to make change. The National Water Dance was an effort to use the art of human movement to generate compassion for the nation’s streams, lakes and oceans.

With Permitting Bill Dead, Some Provisions May Be Resurrected

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:48

Earlier this month, lawmakers announced they were killing House Bill 77, saying that emotions had become so inflamed over the permitting bill that it was best left alone. But now, some of its less controversial provisions might be coming back in a different form.

Natural Resources Commissioner Joe Balash does not undersell the heartburn that HB77 caused. He’ll even refer to it as “toxic,” and jokes about it being “tightly bound” in a casket.
So, when asked what parts of the bill he wants to come back this session, he’s very clear.

“We had all kinds things that caught a lot of heat and light from the public: general permits, appeals, water provisions, temporary water uses, reservations. None of that is what we’re talking about.”

The Parnell administration is currently working with Rep. Cathy Muñoz, a Juneau Republican, to revive language provisions dealing with land exchanges and leases. The idea is to attach it to Senate Bill 106, which already deals with the selling of state land.

Balash says he asked the sponsor of that bill, Sen. Kevin Meyer, if that could work without hijacking the legislation. Meyer was friendly to the idea of SB109 being used as a vehicle.

“This is hitchhiking. He pulled over. Said get in,” says Balash. “We’re good.”

The pressing argument for reviving the land exchange language is to allow property swaps in places like Ketchikan, Anchor Point, and Juneau.

Rep. Cathy Muñoz says the Juneau land swap in question has dragged out for more than a decade under existing statute.

“The trail that accesses Point Bridget State Park is on private land. So there’s a great interest on the part of the State and also on the part of Echo Ranch in having an equal value trade so the State can have access to the park, and Echo Ranch will have access to their facility.”

Balash says there was language in HB77 that would have let that deal go through. He says before the administration began real work to bring back those provisions, they went back to see if those sections of the bill had ruffled any feathers.

“We’ve not gotten negative testimony on it. There were never any amendments offered to undo or take out these provisions,” says Balash. “So, no zombies here.”

Because of the sensitive nature of the bill, the administration has been going around to lawmakers’ offices to see if they’re comfortable with the idea.

Sen. Peter Micciche, a Soldotna Republican, was among those who got briefed on the matter. Micciche had a number of reservations with the original bill, and he worked with the administration to try to rewrite it in a way that better balanced the interests of conservation and development.

Micciche says he agrees with Balash that some parts of the bill that should pass, and that he’s open to what the administration’s proposing on land exchanges. But he’s not willing to touch anything that generated negative public testimony.

“If they try to go into some of the other sections, then it’s too late,” says Micciche. “It’s too late to talk about those things this year.”

For his part, Balash says the administration is willing to drop the issue if there’s any push-back.

“If it were to become controversial, it’s not worth taking any heat over,” says Balash.

The exact changes that are being considered have not become public. Balash says they could come in the form of a bill rewrite sometime this week, or as an amendment to the land sale bill.

Legislature Passes Bill On AGDC Appointment

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:41

The Alaska Legislature has passed a measure allowing out-of-state residents to serve on the board of a corporation that could play a key role in a major liquefied natural gas pipeline project.

Download Audio

The Senate’s 13-7 vote helps clear the way for Richard Rabinow, a former pipeline company executive from Texas, to serve on the board of the Alaska Gasline Development Corp.

Governor Sean Parnell appointed Rabinow last September and has defended the appointment as falling within his discretion under the constitution. Rabinow faces confirmation Thursday.

Supporters of the bill, including House Speaker Mike Chenault, have said it was an oversight to not explicitly allow for out-of-state residents to serve on the board. They say they want the best people possible to serve.

Opponents say Alaskans should make policy decisions for Alaskans.

Legislature Considers $150m to Help Refineries

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:40

The Flint Hills refinery in North Pole plans to cease operation this spring, and the Parnell Administration warns Petro Star’s refinery in North Pole might be next. A bill crafted by the Administration would prop up Alaska’s three remaining oil refineries with $150 million in state funds. Even some legislators who are helping advance the bill say they’re uncomfortable with it.

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But Fairbanks Republican Representative Steve Thompson says he worries it’s not enough money. He says Fairbanks needs Petro Star’s Interior refinery, especially if it hopes to attract the new F-35 fighter units to Eielson Air Force Base.

“No jet fuel? Goodbye. F16s (will) move. That means Eielson is going to close. 1500 civilian jobs. We’re going to have empty houses in Fairbanks. The economy is going to tank further,” he said at a House Finance hearing Monday.

State Natural Resources Commissioner Joe Balash says the high price of North Slope crude makes it hard for in-state refineries to compete with fuel imported from Outside. The Administration originally proposed $300 million in refinery assistance, primarily to help Petro Star, which faces higher costs for crude delivery now that its neighbor, Flint Hills, won’t be contributing.

Anchorage Democratic Representative Les Gara says he wants the refinery to stay open, too, but he calls the bill pending in the House now “insane policy.”

“It’s a bailout, it’s a giveaway, it’s poorly crafted,” Gara says. “It costs the state $150 million over five years, and it gives $50 million to Tesoro who doesn’t even want the money. At a time when we can’t afford our schools we need to come up with smarter solutions than just giving money to companies.”

The bill would allow an Alaska refinery to collect $10 million a year from the state for five years. That would mean $20 million a year for Petro Star, which has refineries in North Pole and Valdez, and $10 million a year for Tesoro’s operation in Kenai. The companies would get the money in the form of tax credits, or in cash if the company doesn’t owe state taxes. The refineries would have to do is show they spent $25 million a year on infrastructure. Gara says the definition is wide open, to include buying or altering any tangible property. And, says Gara, there are no limits on what the refinery can do with its state money. Companies can “keep the money in profits, give the money to their executives, give the money to their share holders,” Gara says “There are no sideboards.”

He proposed offering the refineries low-interest loans instead, but his amendment failed 8-3 in the House Finance Committee Monday. Rep. Tammie Wilson, a North Pole Republican, says Petro Star is too close to the edge for loans.

“Where they’re at right now, they may not be here in five years,” she said. “They’re not going to get a loan for something in which the company might not be able to make it. We have to do something now to make them healthy.”

Petro Star is owned by Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. ASRC Senior Vice President Tara Sweeney, at the Capitol to press for the bill, says she’s doing what she can not to close the refinery.

“The refining industry in Alaska is not healthy. We’re down here working to ensure that it is, and the tools are there that are necessary to keep us afloat,” she says.

“If it does close, the state says it would lose millions of dollars a year in revenues.  But lawmakers who question the refinery assistance bill point out Petro Star hasn’t opened its books for them. Republican Rep Alan Austerman of Kodiak says he’s troubled by the lack of information they’ve received from the state, too.

“We’re just going based upon, a company come(s) to the state of Alaska saying that ‘we’re going to go out of business if you don’t give us some money,’” Austerman says.

Fairbanks Democrat David Guttenberg says the bill was dropped on them in the last days of the session with no meaningful analysis. He’d like not to vote for it but he says they’re in a bind.

“Here we are faced with this, you know, this is what we have. Is it the best thing? I don’t think so. Is it the only thing? Yeah,” Guttenberg says.

The bill cleared the House Finance Committee Tuesday. Sponsors hope to get it through both the House and Senate before the Legislature adjourns this weekend.

Nikiski LNG Plant May Reopen Soon

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:39

The ConocoPhillips LNG plant in Nikiski may be re-opening soon, thanks to a boost from the federal government. The Department of Energy announced Monday that it has approved a request from the company to resume LNG exports to Japan.

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Yukon Fishermen Prepare For Summer Of Conservation

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:38

Fishers on the Kuskokwim River are expecting unprecedented restrictions to bring more king salmon to spawning grounds. On the Yukon River, fisherman can expect a similar set of restrictions.

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Twenty years ago, king salmon runs on the Yukon averaged 300,000 fish. In 2013, biologists counted just 76,000 fish.

Stephanie Schmidt is the Yukon River Research Biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

“I think with this run size, we’re going to have trouble reaching our escapement goals even if there is no harvest on the Yukon river,” Schmidt said.

The forecast this year is for between 64,000-121,000 kings. Managers don’t expect to have any directed king openings. Still, some kings could be accidentally caught in gillnets intended for other salmon species or whitefish.

Schmidt says fishers will likely not be able to use gillnets unless many more kings than expected come into the river. Using non-traditional gear is the subject of current discussions between managers and fishermen.

“The the idea is can we provide opportunity to fisherman for subsistence fishing in a way that would allow them to catch those other species, especially the abundant summer chum salmon or the fall chum salmon that come in and are supposed to have a good run this year. Are there way* that they can target those species and not harm king salmon?” Schmidt said.

One gear type is dipnets, which allow for the live release of kings. Fisherman may also be using beach seines, and fish wheels with a live chute. There’s no firm fishing schedule set, but subsistence fishing will close according to law when the first pulse of king salmon enter the river. As breakup approaches, Schmidt says conversations with Yukon residents have been positive.

“Fisherman on the Yukon recognize the issue, they recognize that we’re in a situation where we need to conserve, and we need to get more king salmon on the spawning grounds if we’re going to give this run any chance of recovering,” Schmidt said.

On the commercial side, The Board of Fish tweaked the rules for commercial summer chum fisherman. Non-circular dipnets can be as large as 6 feet by 3 feet. The board did not pass a proposal from the Yukon Delta Fisheries Development association to allow for purse seines during times of king salmon conservation.

Some Southeast Chinook Runs Expected To Be Strong

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:37

King Salmon are expected to be plentiful in parts of Southeast Alaska this summer.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game this month announced a king salmon harvest quota allowed under the Pacific Salmon Treaty and based on the forecasts of Chinook returning to rivers and streams on the Pacific coast of the U.S. and Canada.

Download Audio

MEA Official Accuses Anchorage Assembly Of Misusing City Funds

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:36

A Matanuska Electric Association official charges that the Anchorage Municipal Assembly is spending city funds on private interests.

Joe Griffith, MEA’s executive director, has contacted Anchorage officials with concerns that city money is being spent on one Assemblyman’s legal fight against a power station upgrade.

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In a letter to Anchorage Municipal Assembly chair Ernie Hall, MEA executive director Joe Griffith says that one Assembly member, Eagle River’s Bill Starr, is planning to spend city funds to fight MEA’s appeal of a Muni Planning and Zoning Commission decision. Griffith says this is clearly a misuse of public funds.

“The Assembly has had no role whatsoever in this process,” Griffith said. “Now they, so far, have not had to weigh in on it, so therefore, they have no formal position.”

“And yet they have chosen to fund the attorneys that are fighting MEA’s request of a review of the process that refused us the right to upgrade a substation.”

Griffith adds, that, by law, MEA must maintain it’s facilities to keep up with power demands.

The city’s planning and zoning commission had earlier denied a bid by MEA for a conditional use permit for the upgrade of the power company’s Justine Parks substation in Eagle River. Now MEA is appealing the commission’s decision to the Board of Adjustment.

According to Griffith’s letter, Starr has tapped the law firm of Ashburn and Mason to help him in opposing the power station upgrade.

Starr would not agree to a recorded interview. He says there’s no impropriety, because the city maintains legal counsel for Assembly members. He says the “Board of Adjustment process is complicated” and that he wants good legal advice on how the Board operates.

Starr says MEA wants to build the substation in a residential neighborhood, and that “the residents have a right to complain.”

Haines Residents Pursue Railroad Link

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:35

Some residents in Haines are pursing the dream of a railroad that may one day link the community to Interior Alaska, Yukon mines and to a future port facility. The state and other stakeholders aren’t dismissing the idea outright.

Download Audio

Group Uses National Water Dance To Raise Compassion

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:28

A small group of people gathered Saturday in Anchorage to use art to make change. The National Water Dance was an effort to use the art of human movement to generate compassion for the nation’s streams, lakes and oceans.

Download Audio

Petersburg begins 2nd annual Pedometer Challenge

Southeast Alaska News - Tue, 2014-04-15 16:14

Pedometers like this one are being given out to Petersburg residents. Photo/Angela Denning

At least one hundred people in Petersburg should be wearing pedometers today to count the steps they are taking. They are participating in the Pedometer Challenge. It’s the second year the program has happened here in town. Last year, the Petersburg Indian Association ran the event through their tobacco prevention grant. Two-hundred seventy people participated.

Kim Kilkenny with Petersburg Mental Health Services says mental health and physical health go hand in hand.

“Mental health and physical health are intertwined,” Kilkenny says. “We believe in treating the whole body and that if your physical health is not good or you’re struggling with pain, mental health is not going to feel good and you’re going to struggle with that, and so, that’s why we talk about all of it. ‘Is your social health good, is your mental health good. What can we do to keep you active? You know, what are some behavior strategies that will help improve your mood and decrease symptoms?’ So, it’s just enmeshed and you know, our doctors ask us, ‘are we getting exercise’? You know, it’s all inter-related to our whole well being.”

Kilkenny’s office took over the Pedometer Challenge this year through a different funding source– a $24,000 dollar Community Transformations grant from the CDC or Centers for Disease Control. The grant came through the South East Alaska Regional Health Consortium or SEARHC.

Martha Pearson is a Program Manager for SEARHC. I spoke with her and Kilkenny about the details of this year’s Pedometer Challenge.

Angela: “Now the actual mechanics of the pedometer, it’s basically recording how many steps you take or those types of motions?”
Kim: “Right. You’ll want to test it out that the steps are corrected and it will do 24 hours, count your steps and then the way we are having people measure their participation is by calling in their total numbers for that week. They’re logging in, this year we are doing it through survey monkey so we have instant data and know where everybody’s at and that way we don’t lose any information or add wrong (laughs) so that’s how it’s going down.”
Martha: “And also the beauty of using the pedometers is that each participant gets their own feedback right away of how they’re doing. They can set their own personal goals. You know, for some person, 10,000 steps a day is no problem. That’s about five miles of stepping a day. For some people that would be just an impossible task. So, for them maybe 5,000 steps or 2,000. Whatever it is, you can set your own goal and work to reach it. And that’s why this program is likely to be more successful is because everyone can join in and participate on their own rate.”
Angela: “How long is this challenge going for?”
Kim: “Six weeks. The challenge will end May 23. The reporting period opens on Thursday and it closes on Sunday for that previous week. So to be eligible for the drawing for a weekly prize, you’ll need to register during that four day window.”
Angela: “Speaking of prizes…”
Kim: “They’re fabulous!”
Angela: “I guess that’s some incentive to keep going.”
Kim: “Yeah, we included some physical health wellbeing prizes or incentives. My favorite– groups are eligible for weekly prizes as well–is two hours at the bouncy castle at Parks and Rec. So, adults are encouraged…you know…it’s a lot of fun if you’ve ever been in the bouncy castle (laughs).”
Angela: “I’ve actually seen pictures and my first question was, ‘is there an age limit’(laughs)?.”
Kim: “No. We checked and there is no age limit (laughs) and then we have kayaks, we have an I pad mini. Well, kayak, sorry, singular. We have some galaxy tablets, Zumba cards, Skate of Gear has a package that they’re donating. So, very cool prizes.”

As of last week, about 100 people had registered.

People can sign up for the Pedometer Challenge through Friday (April 18). Pedometers can be picked up at Public Health or you can call Petersburg Indian Association or Mental Health and they will get one to you.

NYPD Shuts Down Controversial Unit That Spied On Muslims

NPR News - Tue, 2014-04-15 15:06

The New York Police Department's Demographics Unit reportedly carried out systematic surveillance of Muslim neighborhoods to root out terrorist threats, but it never produced a single usable lead.

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Soul to Soul: April 5-6, 2014

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Tue, 2014-04-15 14:50

Here’s the music playlist from the April 5-6, 2014, edition of Soul to Soul with Marvel and Sherry Johnson. All tracks played are listed below in the following format:

  • Song Title
  • Artist Name
  • Album
  • Duration
  • Label

Secret Lovers
Atlantic Starr
04:25
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Circles (Radio Edit)
Atlantic Starr
04:03

Fantastic Voyage (Extended)
Lakeside
06:12

Just Got Paid (Extended)
Johnny Kemp
05:29

Zhane – Request Line Instrumental Ripp
Zhane
03:59

Murphy’s Law (Radio Edit)
Cheri
03:55

STS Sweep 2014 – Old Skool Mixdown 1

00:55

Boogie Oogie Oogie (Radio Edit)
A Taste Of Honey
03:38

Encore
Cheryl Lynn
03:35

June Old 2 New 2004
STS Sweep
01:17

Love & Sex Pt. 2 (Snip Hitz)
Joe ft Kelly Rowland
05:24
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Love & Sex Pt. 2 (Intro Outro)
Joe ft Kelly Rowland
06:25
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Sensational [clean]
Marc7
04:14

STS Sweep 2014
Liz Old Skool
00:51

I Aint Mad At Cha Featuring Danny Boy (Edited)
2pac
04:54

If I Could Build My Whole World Around You (with T
Marvin Gaye
02:23

STS Motown 2007 – Motown Today Tomorrow Forever

01:38

If I Could Build My Whole World Around You (with T
Marvin Gaye
02:23

Sugar Hill (Instrumental)
AZ
05:38
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Cinca Terra (Original Mix)
Gilles Bineaux
08:41
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Natural High
Bloodstone
04:02
Shout Factory/TJL

What Becomes Of The Brokenhearted
Jimmy Ruffin
02:59

Hold On (Lp)
En Vouge
05:05
Collectables

When I Get Free (Edited)
2pac
04:18

Sweet Loving (Reggae)
Christopher Martin
04:16
www.franchiserecordpool.com

LoveZone 2010 Theme – Love Rock the Best 2010 Jet Fades end

02:17

Slow Jam Mix Vol 4
Heatwave, Floaters, Surface
18:17

Slow Jam Mix Vol 5
RJ’s Latest Arrival, Howard Hewett
18:02

I Cant Tell You Why
Howard Hewett
03:53

Love & Sex Pt. 2 (Intro Outro)
Joe ft Kelly Rowland
06:25
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Jet Passing Over
Sound Effect
00:37

STS Sweep 2014 – Old Skool Mixdown 1

00:55

Luther Vandross – Forever, For Always, For Love

06:20

When I Look In Your Eye
Cherrelle
04:54

STS Sweep 2014 – Old Skool Mixdown 1

00:55

That’s The Way Of The World
Earth, Wind & Fire
08:43

When Can I See You
Babyface
03:49
Epic

I Wish
Toni Braxton
03:05

Time – Gigolos Get Lonely Too_PN

04:42

Free
Deniece Williams
05:59
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Love No Limit (Jazz)
Mary J. Blige
04:15
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Mary J. Blige – Never To Much

05:11

Cry Together
The O’Jays
05:38

(Goodnight My Love) Pleasant Dreams
Tavares
05:38

I Do Love You
Midnight Players
02:51

Love Changes
Mother’s Finest
04:54
Columbia

June Old 2 New 2004
STS Sweep
01:17

Blow In The Breeze [clean]
Marc7
03:37

Ghetto Gospel (Edited)
2pac
03:59

Playa Cardz Right (Female) (Edited)
Tupac Shakur
04:34

Love & Sex Pt. 2 (Snip Hitz)
Joe ft Kelly Rowland
05:24
www.franchiserecordpool.com

Sound Effect

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