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Screening for Prostate Cancer

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 11:00

Dr. Joshua Logan

Screening recommendations for prostate cancer have changed, leading to confusion and uncertainty for some. Join host Dr. Thad Woodard and guest Dr. Josh Logan to clarify current recommendations and the reasoning behind them.

HOST: Dr. Thad Woodard

GUESTS: 

  • Dr. Joshua Logan is the first and only urologic oncologist in the state of Alaska. He specializes in studying, diagnosing and treating cancers of the urinary system, which includes the prostate, testicles, kidneys and bladder. A native of Atlanta, Dr. Logan comes to Anchorage from Southern California, where he served as a fellow in urologic oncology at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) before joining the Alaska Urological Institute. He received his medical degree from the prestigious Emory University School of Medicine.

LINKS:

LIVE BROADCAST: Monday, April 7, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. AKDT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Monday, April 7, 2014 at 9:00 p.m. AKDT

DR. WOODARD’S FAVORITE HEALTH AND SCIENCE LINKS:

SUBSCRIBE: Get Line One: Your Health Connection updates automatically by:

LINE ONE: YOUR HEALTH CONNECTION ARCHIVE

Audio will be posted following broadcast.

Cuisine And Culture Transform A Dallas Neighborhood

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 10:58

Trinity Groves, a 15-acre restaurant incubator, brought Chinese-Latin food and economic vitality back to West Dallas. What was once a dangerous neighborhood is now a hotspot for international eats.

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Sealaska Dividends Include No Corporate Earnings

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 10:28

The spring dividend for most Sealaska shareholders will be $721, but some will receive less than a tenth of that amount.

Sealaska Plaza, the corporation’s headquarters.

The total distribution to the regional Native corporation’s 21,600 shareholders is $11.8 million. Payments will be mailed out April 8 and direct-deposited April 11.

Most stockholders own 100 shares. The amount of dividends differ due to status of the corporation’s Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian members.

Those enrolled in Sealaska plus an urban Native corporation, such as Sitka’s Shee Atiká, receive the full $721. So do at-large shareholders, who are only enrolled in Sealaska.

Those holding stock in a village corporation, such as Saxman’s Cape Fox, get $57.

The difference is a payout from a pool of regional Native corporations’ natural-resource earnings. Sealaska pays resource earnings directly to urban shareholders, as part of their dividends. But it pays the resource revenues to village corporations, which decide whether to pass them on to shareholders.

Descendents of original shareholders also get $57 per 100 shares.  Elders in any category receive an extra $57. Those funds come from Sealaska’s permanent fund.

None of the money is coming from Sealaska’s business operations. CEO Chris McNeil says the corporation is in the second year of restructuring its operations.  That includes last summer’s sale of its share of plastics factories in Alabama, Iowa and Guadalajara, Mexico.

More details on Sealaska’s business operations will be in its annual report, to be released in May.

Legislature OKs $5.8 Million In Capitol Repairs

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 10:23

A ridge of crumbling masonry near the top of Alaska’s Capitol, April 3, 2014. (Photo by Skip Gray/Gavel Alaska)

The legislature has approved $5.8 million in additional repairs and renovations to the Capitol building.

“Go forth, fix the Capitol,”said Rep. Mike Hawker, R-Anchorage. He chairs the Legislative Council, which authorized a contract with Dawson Construction on Thursday. The council manages the legislature’s in-house administration.

This is the second phase of the project. The need for major repairs of the facade and earthquake retrofits has been well documented, punctuated by occasional chunk of falling masonry. Building manager Jeff Goodell recently took some time to preempt a potential drizzle of stonework on 60 of the building’s most important tenants; legislators lined up out front for a group photo Wednesday.

Detail of brick façade exposed during renovation of Alaska’s Capitol, April 3, 2014. (Photo by Skip Gray/Gavel Alaska)

“Our building manager spent the weekend taking loose chunks of concrete off the parapets that were so loose, that they had a very real chance of falling and hitting someone while we were taking that picture,” Hawker said.

Outside the Capitol, Goodell points out where he’d worked along a lip of crumbling brick near the roof. He says masons recently told him the pace of deterioration is shifting.

“You know, this golden girl is 83 years old. It took a long time to get to this point, but now, things really get accelerated,” Goodell says.

In the Capitol’s maintenance section, Goodell pulls out a 5-gallon bucket and cardboard box filled with crumbly bits and chunks of masonry.

“There are big parts down in here. Of course, this is just little stuff you’re seeing at the top. But there’s big stuff in there,” Goodell says.

He’s keeping it “as evidence.”

“This is for people to see, to know that we’re not monkeying around,” Goodell says.

Workers completed the first phase of Capitol repairs and renovations last fall. That phase included repairing the granite front steps, reinforcing the marble columns, replacing the plumbing and draining systems and cleaning up the crawlspace beneath the building.

With the contract approval, work will resume this summer.

Alaska House Names April as ‘Child Abuse Prevention Month’

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 10:07

The Alaska House of Representatives voted unanimously Thursday to name April “Child Abuse Prevention Month” in Alaska.

House Concurrent Resolution 21 was sponsored by Representative Geran Tarr from Anchorage. The resolution heads to the Senate for consideration.

In 2013 there were over 40,000 allegation of child maltreatment in Alaska.

Just last month Alaska Governor Sean Parnell issued an Executive Proclamation naming April as “Child Abuse Prevention Month.”

Nationally, April has been “Child Abuse Prevention Month” since the first Executive Declaration in 1983.

Food tastes better when it’s shared

Southeast Alaska News - Fri, 2014-04-04 10:05

Chuck Miller(R) and son Jay harvest roe-on-hemlock. (KCAW photo/by Emily Forman).

It’s crisp, crunchy, and salty — and you’ll never find it in a bag in the grocery store. Dipped in seal oil or eulachon oil (hooligan), it is a traditional Southeast Alaskan delicacy that signals spring as surely as a warm, sunny day. But, gathering herring eggs-on-hemlock branches is about a lot more than food.

Listen to iFriendly audio.

ANB Harbor. Stall 10. Small boat on the left. That’s Chuck Miller’s response to anyone looking for herring eggs. Miller has the means to harvest this traditional food in the traditional way. So, sharing the resource is a no brainer. “Food tastes better when you share with people and that’s the way our Native people are,” says Miller.

Like many subsistence fisherman, Miller practices the roe-on-hemlock harvesting method. He invited me to join him and his son, Jay, on a recent harvesting trip.

Miller: We are ready to get some fuel.
EF: With the fuel and everything how much does a trip like this cost you?
Miller: Over 200 dollars easy but it’s worth it.

That includes engine repairs and two trips out to Middle Island. Miller says it’s worth it because he’ll end up feeding at least a dozen people. But within minutes, I learn that he has deeper reasons for the practice. Jay explains.

Jay Miller helps his dad harvest herring roe. (KCAW photo/ by Emily Forman)

Jay: The first time I went out I was 6 years old.
EF: Do you remember what that was like?
Jay: Yeah, I went with my uncle Eli my Dad’s brother.

Miller: The yellow buoy that’s on there is my brother’s buoy and my brother’s been passed away now for ten years. He was 5 years older than me. We used to do this together. This is the last of the gear that he had that he used.

As we pull into a cove on the backside of Middle Island the water abruptly changes from deep blue to a milky aqua. That’s what happens when you add a whole lot of fish sperm — or milt — into the mix.

Miller: So it is still spawning in here.

Plastic bottles and milk jugs speckle the shallow water – all tied to submerged hemlock branches. A handful of those have “Miller” written on them in bold black sharpie ink.

He says people have stolen his sets in the past – which isn’t unusual when branches are left unsupervised overnight to gather eggs. As a result he’s mildly apprehensive around other fisherman.

Miller: He’s probably just staring me down because he doesn’t know who I am. But I’m gonna let him get a good look at me because I lived here my whole life.

Miller has a way of diffusing the tension.

Miller: Hey are you taking my sets? Haha! You guys look like you got a good set in!
Miller: K it’s coming up on your side. Right there, right there, right there!

Jay grabs the milk jug attached to his Uncle Eli’s yellow buoy. He clutches the trailing thick rope. Using all of his body weight he wrestles the egg-laden branch to the surface.

Miller: Get it to where you got some leverage. is it moving? It’s probably super heavy?

When its ready to harvest, a branch can weigh well over 400 pounds.

Miller: What we do is clip off pieces of it to get it in the boat. Holy smokes! That’s a good one right there!

Miller hoists the dripping branch into the boat. It’s coated with eggs and looks like it was dipped in a vat of rubber cement.

Miller: See this is the thickness you want, some people get them a little thicker, but not much more than that.

It’s a bountiful harvest, which according to Miller is thanks to his brother’s buoy.

Miller: It’s my good luck buoy and usual that’s the one every year that produces quite a bit it’s like my brother is looking out for us.

He tosses the leftover branch overboard.

Miller:Gunalcheesh! Thank you! We used the tree to help us.

Take away the power boat, and plastic milk jug buoys, and it isn’t difficult to picture this practice taking place long before Western and Native cultures met.

Miller: If i don’t start sharing what I know right away… I might not be here tomorrow.

When we return to ANB harbor, and pull into Stall 10. I realize that gathering herring eggs on hemlock branches is an expression of gratitude. Gratitude for the the teachings of his ancestors, gratitude for food, and the chance to pass on this way of life.

Nest Halts Sales Of Smoke Detector, Disables 'Wave' Feature

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 10:00

The Google owned company discovered users could unintentionally disable the device by waving their hands in front of the detector.

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Police: Meth mailed to Ketchikan man

Southeast Alaska News - Fri, 2014-04-04 09:59

A 38-year-old Ketchikan man faces felony drug charges after police and U.S. Postal Inspectors allegedly found 23 grams of methamphetamine in a package mailed to a home on North Tongass Highway.

Christopher J. Kitsmiller was arraigned Thursday on one count of third-degree controlled-substance misconduct. Sgt. Andy Berntson of the Ketchikan Police Department said the package was discovered by Postal Inspectors when it came through Anchorage on its way to Ketchikan.

“A shipment of approximately 23 grams of methamphetamine was intercepted bound for a residence that Mr. Kitsmiller sometimes stays at, which is a primary residence of one of his family members,” Berntson said. “After that was seized, search warrants revealed the methamphetamine was inside.”

Berntson said authorities allowed the package to be delivered, and Kitsmiller allegedly accepted delivery. After that, police served another search warrant at the home and made the arrest.

Berntson said Kitsmiller had been on the police department’s radar, partly because of prior federal drug offenses, and partly due to more recent information that police had gathered.

Berntson added that Kitsmiller took responsibility following his arrest.

“He’s admitting that it was bound for him,” Berntson said. “That it was his shipment. Sometimes that happens, sometimes it doesn’t.”

Berntson said drug-related paraphernalia also was found and seized during the search. Kitsmiller remains in custody on $50,000 bail. His next hearing is set for April 11in Ketchikan District Court.

India Sentences 3 To Hang For Multiple Rapes

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 09:14

The men were sentenced under a new, tougher law on sexual assaults. They were convicted in two separate cases, including the rape of a 23-year-old photojournalist in Mumbai.

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Could A 'Barbie' Get Real? What A Healthy Fashion Doll Looks Like

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 09:14

Barbie dolls are marketed with sports gear, but could they actually run on those spindly gams? The design for a doll based on an average 19-year-old's physique looks like it really has legs.

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Federal Judge Says He'll Require Ohio To Recognize Same-Sex Marriages

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 09:12

Voters approved a prohibition in 2004. The judge, during arguments over a case involving birth certificates of children of same-sex couples, previewed a decision he plans to issue on April 14.

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City Council moves hospital project forward

Southeast Alaska News - Fri, 2014-04-04 09:09

The Ketchikan City Council meeting Thursday focused mostly on hospital-related projects, including the relocation of the KAR House. City Mayor Lew Williams III joined KRBD for a recap.

A “Polar Bat” flies to Anchorage

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 08:25

Kate Egan and Scott Hogsed in Die Fledermaus or The Polar Bat

Anchorage Opera has re-worked the classic Strauss opera, Die Fledermaus (which means “the bat”) with an Alaskan flair to become The Polar Bat. Join librettist Deborah Brevoort and stage director Bill Fabris to find out how they made the change this week on Stage Talk.

HOSTS:

GUESTS: 

ORIGINAL BROADCAST: Friday April 4th, 2014 at 2:45 p.m.

SUBSCRIBE: Get Stage Talk updates automatically — via:

STAGE TALK ARCHIVE

Audio will be posted following radio broadcast.

Bush's 'Art Of Leadership' Puts Putin And Others On Display

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 08:21

The 43rd president has taken up art since leaving the White House. The Bush center in Dallas is showing some of his portraits of world leaders. His favorite: that of his father, the 41st president.

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Tasting French Fries For A Living Can Be A Pain In The Mouth

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 08:04

Food industry "sensory panelists" spend hours chewing, swishing and analyzing food, sometimes to the point of pain. These tests ensure mass-produced products like frozen french fries hit the spot.

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Alaska Edition April 4, 2014

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 07:54

Municipal election results in Anchorage. Oil and gas issues continue to dominate the legislative session. The battle over SB 21 – the oil tax revision – continues. Purchasing the legislative office building no longer seems like such a good idea to lawmakers. This is sexual assault awareness month. What can we expect from the Legislature in the last two weeks of the session? The U.S. Supreme Court refuses to hear the Katie John case. An unusual murder trial  in progress on Kodiak.

HOST: Michael Carey

GUESTS:

  • Steve MacDonald, Channel 2 News
  • Jill Burke Alaska Dispatch.
  • Tim Bradner,  Alaska Journal of Commerce.

KSKA (FM 91.1) BROADCAST: Friday, April 4 at 2:00 p.m. and Saturday, April 5  at 6:00 p.m.

Alaska Public Television BROADCAST: Friday, April 4 , at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, April 5  at 4:30 p.m.

SUBSCRIBE: Get Alaska Edition updates automatically — via emailRSS or podcasts

ALASKA EDITION ARCHIVE

AK Beat: Land-use deal should boost Alaska's Susitna-Watana dam project

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 07:41
AK Beat: Land-use deal should boost Alaska's Susitna-Watana dam project Deal with six Cook Inlet village corporations and Cook Inlet Region Inc. helps efforts to build a huge dam on the Susitna River -- though hurdles still remain for the Susitna-Watana Hydroelectric Project.April 4, 2014

Two Brave Journalists In Afghanistan

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 06:58

The two Associated Press journalists shot in Afghanistan shared a gift for finding the humanity in war zones. Photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed, and reporter Kathy Gannon was wounded.

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Racing's Michael Schumacher Has 'Moments Of Consciousness'

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-04 05:56

The Formula One driving legend suffered a severe head injury while skiing in December. Doctors started to bring him out of a medically induced coma in late January. He is hospitalized in France.

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Beefy state loans energize efforts to expand natural gas distribution in Fairbanks

Alaska and Yukon Headlines - Fri, 2014-04-04 05:22
Beefy state loans energize efforts to expand natural gas distribution in Fairbanks The effort to expand natural gas distribution in Fairbanks took a big step forward Thursday with the approval of $23 million in state loans aimed at preparing for a gas trucking plan slated to begin in a couple of years.April 4, 2014