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From Our Listeners

Alaska and Yukon Headlines

Imagining a Town Square Park for Everyone

Fri, 2014-04-11 13:00

An historical rendering of Town Square Park, courtesy of USKH.

All of Anchorage is invited to an April 26 event in the Alaska Center for the Performing Arts to imagine a modified Town Square Park. Organizers are calling it a charrette. What the heck is a charrette? It sounds like a $1M word when a five-cent one might do; as if  only the people who understand that word get to participate.

Nothing could be further from the intent. According to the planners’ website, “a charrette is a collaborative design process where, over a short time frame, a group of individuals address a design issue.” It’s a public meeting where you not only come together to discuss something, you  might even draw your vision of what it could look like.

Change is in the air for Town Square due to a number of reasons. Some feel the hilly and treed space isn’t safe. Others think there’s too much cement in what should mostly be green space, a respite from downtown concrete. Still others say a busy park is a safer park and opening up the space may make it easier to stage events there. A consortium of community groups joined forces to host this free event open to everyone. Ideally, diverse users of Town Square will participate so multiple visions of a successful park will emerge.

Our show today hopes to set that stage. We’ll talk about the park’s formation and history, the challenges of living with the current design, and some of the redesign potential for the park. Helping us along in the studio will be longtime Alaska resident John Blaine and landscape architect Dwayne Adams. By phone, we’ll include some additional perspectives to enrich the conversation. Most importantly, we hope to hear from listeners on their views of the park and if and how it should change.

Town Square Park Charrette
Saturday, April 26, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Alaska Center for the Performing Arts

Jointly sponsored by UAA Center for Community Engagement and Learning, Anchorage Downtown Partnership, Alaska State Council on the Arts, The Parks Foundation, Anchorage Parks and Recreation, Alaska Center for the Performing Arts, The Municipality of Anchorage/Long Range Planning Section and Anchorage Economic Development Corporation.

HOST: Kathleen McCoy

GUESTS:

  • John Blaine
  • Dwayne Adams

LINKS:

PARTICIPATE:

  • Call 550-8433 (Anchorage) or 1-888-353-5752  (statewide) during the live broadcast (2:00 – 3:00pm)
  • Send email to hometown@alaskapublic.org before, during or after the live broadcast (e-mails may be read on air)
  • Post your comment or question below (comments may be read on air)

LIVE BROADCAST: Wednesday, April 16 2014. 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. (Alaska time)

REPEAT BROADCAST: Wednesday, April 16, 2014. 9:00 – 10:00 p.m. (Alaska time)

SUBSCRIBE: Get Hometown, Alaska updates automatically — via email, RSS or podcasts

HOMETOWN ALASKA ARCHIVE

Firth edges EDI in oldtimer title game

Fri, 2014-04-11 12:37
Goalie James Billy kept the Firth Rangers in the game until their offensive guns finally woke up in the second period.

Uphill Climb

Fri, 2014-04-11 12:35
A Peel Climb-A-Thon held in a Porter Creek home Saturday helped raise $2,375 to support Peel Watershed lawsuits this summer.

Pasloski impresses at Canadian swim trials, NCAAs

Fri, 2014-04-11 12:31
Bronwyn Pasloski was unable to squeak onto Canada’s swim team bound for the Commonwealth Games, despite an impressive performance at the Canadian swim trials.

Violence Against Women Act and Recent Developments Over Tradition

Fri, 2014-04-11 12:30

This week on Addressing Alaskans, UAA Atwood Chair of Journalism Mark Trahant speaks as part of a series titled “Women and Agents of Violence,” held in honor of Women’s History Month. Trahant has worked in print and broadcast journalism for many years, with organizations like the Seattle Times, the Salt Lake Tribune and the Arizona Republic. He reported for the Frontline episode “The Silence,” documenting the Catholic Church’s abuse of Alaska Natives.

Trahant is a member of Idaho’s Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and former president of the Native American Journalists Association. He authored the 2010 book “The Last Great Battle of the Indian Wars.” Trahant is currently serving as the 20th Atwood Chair of Journalism at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

BROADCAST ON KSKA: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. (Alaska time)

REPEAT BROADCAST: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 9:00 p.m. (Alaska time)

SPEAKER

  •  Mark Trahant, UAA Atwood Chair of Journalism

RECORDED: March 17, 2014 at the UAA Bookstore

HOST: UAA Bookstore Events

About

Addressing Alaskans features local lectures and forums recorded at public events taking place in Southcentral, Alaska. A variety of local organizations host speakers addressing topics that matter to Alaskans. To let us know about an upcoming community event that you would like to hear on Addressing Alaskans, please Contact Us with details.

SUBSCRIBE: Get Addressing Alaskans updates automatically via e-mailRSS or podcasts.

ADDRESSING ALASKANS ARCHIVE

Sweden to spend billions on infrastructure

Fri, 2014-04-11 12:15
Sweden to spend billions on infrastructure The plan includes a mix of investment in roads, railways, tunnels and other transportation projects.April 11, 2014

ADD, ADHD and Academic Performance

Fri, 2014-04-11 11:00

Maximizing academic performance depends on the educational system and the student. On the next Line One, host Dr. Woodard will discuss a leading cause of school underachievement, attention deficit disorder, with Dr. Lyn Clark of Anchorage. Topics discussed will include causes of ADD/ADHD, symptoms, diagnosis, other problems often accompanying ADD/ADHD, and treatment options proven to be effective.

HOST: Dr. Thad Woodard 

GUESTS: 

  • Dr. Lyn Clark, Anchorage

LINKS:

LIVE BROADCAST: Monday, April 14, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. AKDT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Monday, April 14, 2014 at 9:00 p.m. AKDT

DR. WOODARD’S FAVORITE HEALTH AND SCIENCE LINKS:

SUBSCRIBE: Get Line One: Your Health Connection updates automatically by:

LINE ONE: YOUR HEALTH CONNECTION ARCHIVE

Audio to be posted following broadcast.

AK Beat: Injured man evacuated from Arctic Man ski-snowmachine contest

Fri, 2014-04-11 08:14
AK Beat: Injured man evacuated from Arctic Man ski-snowmachine contest A 40-year-old man was injured at Arctic Man in the HooDoo Mountains and had to be evacuated by helicopter.April 11, 2014

Alaska Edition April 11, 2014

Fri, 2014-04-11 07:58

Revenue forecast for North Slope oil provokes controversy. Rio Tinto leaves the Pebble Partnership. Minimum wage bill gathering steam in House of Representatives. The Anchorage Dispatch purchases the Anchorage Daily News. No-sell booze bill gets committee OK. Gov. Parnell offers tax relief to refineries. Commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation steps into battle over clean up of North Pole refinery. Anchorage police officers writing fewer traffic tickets.

HOST: Michael Carey

GUESTS:

  • Tony Hopfinger, Alaska Dispatch
  • Dermot Cole, Alaska Dispatch
  • Paul Jenkins,  Anchorage Daily Planet

KSKA (FM 91.1) BROADCAST: Friday, April 11, at 2:00 p.m. and Saturday, April 12, at 6:00 p.m.

Alaska Public Television BROADCAST: Friday, April 11, at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, April 12, at 4:30 p.m.

SUBSCRIBE: Get Alaska Edition updates automatically — via emailRSS or podcasts

Listen now:

“Cat” comes to town

Fri, 2014-04-11 07:29

L-R Elizabeth M. Kelly, Enrique Bravo

Tennessee Williams’ story of family, greed and sexuality, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is coming to town as Perseverance Theatre of Juneau brings the play to the Sydney Laurence Theatre. Join Enrique Bravo (Brick) and Kevin T. Bennett (Dr. Baugh) as they visit Stage Talk to tell us all about this classic offering of American theatre opening April 11th and running through the 27th.

HOSTS:

GUESTS: 

ORIGINAL BROADCAST: Friday April 11th, 2014 at 2:45 p.m.

SUBSCRIBE: Get Stage Talk updates automatically — via:

STAGE TALK ARCHIVE

Listen now:

The Armory Show: Art Fair Meets Avant-garde

Fri, 2014-04-11 07:00

Trendy, Avant-garde, the Armory Show has it all.

After my romp through the 2014 Whitney Biennial this past March, I took a crosstown bus from Fifth Avenue to the Armory Show on display on the remodeled Hudson River Piers 92 & 94 that protrude into the Hudson.

With two hundred and five exhibitors, the Armory Show is the largest art fair in New York and really Disneyland for art lovers. You don’t have to be quiet or pretend to be knowledgeable; you can eat, drink and even nap in a corner surrounded by, for instance, a rug that can’t decide whether it’s a wall piece or something to walk over. To say this exhibition is sensory overload is an understatement!

Fairs are a great way to gallery hop and not be intimidated about walking into London’s Whitechapel Gallery or Chicago’s Monique Meloche with your jeans and mittens. The food is delicious; there are bathrooms and places to sit as you contemplate shapes and colors.

The Armory Show takes its name from the famed 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art in the 69th Regiment Armory on Lexington and 25th St.—supposedly the first Modern Art show held in America. Back then this extravaganza displayed 1,300 paintings and sculpture with Marcel Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase leading the way into the history books as scandalous. Our Nude now resides in a small gallery at Philadelphia’s Museum of Art, an easy hour ride on Amtrak from Midtown Manhattan, and tame in comparison to the sex scenes in The Wolf of Wall Street.

In 2001, the present day Armory Show moved to the remade piers. Back story: over one hundred working piers once lined up around Lower Manhattan. Timber and livestock came down the Hudson River from upstate New York to be unloaded or processed for shipments to other locales. Ocean liners escorted the rich and famous across the pond.

In the movie Sabrina, Humphrey Bogart catches a tugboat to chase after Audrey Hepburn who’s already shipboard and heading out of New York Harbor, of course with her poodle and beret. Then there’s On the Waterfront with Marlon Brando showing the seedier, grittier side of dock life. Today, some of the piers have rotted away and only the stumps appear to bob in the waves as landing platforms for birds. But others have been revitalized as in the movie Manhattan, where Woody Allen plays tennis with Diane Keaton inside an inflatable building that occupies an entire pier.

Paper towel dispenser (as art).

I hopped on a crosstown bus near ‘30 Rock’ which takes you within blocks of the show, housed in a massive building that straddles both 92 & 94 piers. It was about 10 am and a long line was forming with uniformed guards mouthing into walkie-talkies, all yelling in unison and seemingly accomplishing nothing. My downloaded press pass allowed me to bypass the line but the poor directions from the goofy crowd controllers sent me up and down the street uselessly. After twenty minutes of enduring March winds off the Hudson, I finally entered into a nirvana of white walls, bright lights and art everywhere.

Food vendors abounded so I eagerly purchased my overdue breakfast coffee and danish– overpriced for their size but tasty. I passed up a faux pushcart of Belgian chocolates as I headed for a lecture about magazine publishing—very boring as the presenters exchanged quips and ignored the audience, but a good chance to snooze and reduce some of my jet lag. I began walking what would be hours through miles of abstraction. I came upon a large canvas that had become storage for handbags; why didn’t I think about this ‘pick-up’ plan when my daughters were in high school and clothes strewn their rooms?

Chinese art is very popular; the Armory Show catalog said curator Xu Zhen was from Shanghai as was an art piece about two large wrist watches. I wondered why this artist hadn’t sculpted two large wrists to show off these time pieces. A Chinese sign said, “Don’t copy anyone” [and] “Do something no one’s ever done before.” Good advice, but I wondered if this sign didn’t contain some hidden message couching subversive political agendas, as the Chinese government isn’t always receptive to ‘art for art’s sake.’ It was difficult to tell which country represented what artists as everyone has gone global—maybe that’s a good thing.

I passed a paper towel dispenser that was really art and a large metal wall piece that looked like a broach. It was after one pm; I was getting hungry. I bypassed champagne at a tapas bar and elevated to the second level for a mini hamburger and a Coke that I ate overlooking the white-capped Hudson River.

The “giant broach” spotted at The Armory Show.

Upstairs the art was less trendy; more of established artists like Tom Wesselmann and Josef Albers. There didn’t seem to be a lot of price tags but if you wanted to invest, say, $5,000 on a small print or drawing, it seemed doable. There was a section devoted to women artists where viewers could see an Anni Albers; like her husband she was a refugee from Hitler’s Europe. And there was Joan Brown, a San Francisco Bay Area painter known for her color and dog portraits.

I passed several areas of large white sofas where viewers could people watch or read the Armory Show catalog. Like the Whitney 2014 Biennial catalogue, the art in this book didn’t match what was displayed on walls—be aware. I elevated back to floor one, past two metallic cartoon-like figures seemingly madly in love. There was a sculpture of running shoes and a super-sized pearl earring, now a wall hanging. Art Forum magazine, my favorite as they provide me with an extra copy monthly, had a long table where the fatigued could pull up a stool and browse through past issues. I passed totemic sculptures of picture-less frames, and a painting that looked like ketchup and mustard had been used instead of paint. On a desk was a doggie vase with tulips that might have been a Jeff Koons?

The “Ketchup and Mustard” painting.

It was nearly five pm and my feet hurt. My head pounded; I empathized with the large wooden figure plastered with nails. A couple were pushing buttons on their iPhones while sitting on a bench shingled like a house. It looked uncomfortable but after hours of walking across two piers of art, I would have sat on a house, too. Heading out, I passed a ring of stones looking somewhat prehistoric. Attempting to exit, I came upon a door that said, “Emergency Exit Only”. A women’s bathroom sign was stationed as the only preventative apparatus for not accidently sending off the alarm system. I laughed; one of the walkie-talkie folks had a sense of humor.

I boarded the crosstown bus back to Midtown and then hopped on the number six subway to Maryann’s Mexican Restaurant near the Astor Place stop where I joined daughter Maddy and boyfriend Joel for a huge Margarita and very fresh veggies on burritos and tacos. Art fairs are a great way to experience contemporary art without feeling uncomfortably out of place.

On the North Slope, a research station comes to life for the summer

Fri, 2014-04-11 06:16
On the North Slope, a research station comes to life for the summer The temperatures at a field research station near Toolik Lake, north of Alaska's Brooks Range, are still frigid, but activity in preparation for the busy summer season is already under way.April 11, 2014

Parnell administration floats $300 million refinery subsidy plan to Legislature

Fri, 2014-04-11 05:49
Parnell administration floats $300 million refinery subsidy plan to Legislature A plan for the state to subsidize Alaska refineries by up to $300 million in direct aid and tax credits over the next five years is needed to stabilize their operations, according to the Parnell administration. But some legislators are skeptical.April 11, 2014

'Amazing America' episode 2: Too little Sarah Palin, but plenty amazing

Fri, 2014-04-11 05:32
'Amazing America' episode 2: Too little Sarah Palin, but plenty amazing This week, there was a devastating lack of Sarah Palin in "Amazing America with Sarah Palin," and everything felt a bit less amazing.April 11, 2014

Study: Shippers and seabirds clash over Arctic territory

Thu, 2014-04-10 23:23
Study: Shippers and seabirds clash over Arctic territory The areas coveted as sea routes for commercial shippers seeking to exploit increasingly ice-free Arctic waters are the same areas that are vital to millions of seabirds that flock north each summer to feast under the midnight sun, says a newly published study.April 10, 2014

SB 108: A simple, sensible, fair solution for restricting access to criminal records

Thu, 2014-04-10 23:04
SB 108: A simple, sensible, fair solution for restricting access to criminal records OPINION: The court system does not have an ongoing obligation to continually make available online the existence of a nonconviction record and allow unrestricted public access to the record long after it is closed.April 10, 2014

After lying low for several months, Joe Miller emerges

Thu, 2014-04-10 22:08
After lying low for several months, Joe Miller emerges Talking with reporters and speaking in one of his first appearances after keeping himself "under the covers" for several months, Miller said he will announce his candidacy for U.S. Senate at the Wasilla Lake Resort on April 21.April 10, 2014

Final Vote On Abortion Bill Delayed After Divisive Amendment Process

Thu, 2014-04-10 21:15

The Alaska State House opened debate on a bill putting limits on state Medicaid payments for abortions on Thursday, only to shelve it and delay a final vote to Sunday.

The bill requires abortion providers to sign a statement that a procedure is “medically necessary,” and it defines that term to include only physical conditions – not mental ones. Advocates of the bill believe the state is paying for elective abortions under the current law, while critics argue that the bill restricts abortion access for poor women.

The version that the Senate passed last year also included a provision establishing a women’s health program, which made the bill more palatable to moderate Republicans. That program would have allowed low-income single women to access birth control and family planning services, with those services largely paid for by the federal government.
A House committee stripped that language in March with support from an influential conservative advocacy group, but the issue of family planning became a major focus of debate during the amendment process.

Rep. Gabrielle LeDoux, the Anchorage Republican carrying the bill, signed on to an amendment signaling the Legislature’s intent “to continue” funding women’s health services in the state. The amendment, which passed 35-5, does not commit the Legislature to expanding services in any way. A handful of Democrats opposed the measure because they did not believe it to be substantive, and they instead tried to reintroduce the original family planning language that would have compelled the state to establish a new program immediately.

LeDoux spoke against the Democrats’ amendment, arguing that the state already provides women’s health services through public health clinics.

“Other than putting contraceptives in the drinking water, I mean we’ve done just about everything we can do as far as family planning services.” LeDoux said on the floor.

The Democrats’ amendment failed on a 22-18 vote, with four Republicans – Lindsey Holmes of Anchorage, Cathy Muñoz of Juneau, Alan Austerman of Kodiak, and Paul Seaton of Homer — breaking ranks with their party.

Sen. Berta Gardner, an Anchorage Democrat who offered the original family planning language last year, thinks the amendment to simply continue funding women’s health services is not a compromise measure, but a fig leaf.

“It means nothing,” said Gardner in an interview. “It’s just like a little ‘P.S.’ but without the force of law.”

While the family planning amendments prompted the most discussion on the floor, the amendments that showed the greatest strife on the bill dealt with the lack of mental health exception.

One amendment added that exception back in, which would have allowed women receiving medication for psychiatric disorders to qualify for abortion coverage because of the pregnancy risk that creates. That failed 21-19, with Mike Hawker of Anchorage joining the bloc of Republicans seeking to alter the bill. The other amendment would have allowed for a mental health exception only in cases where suicide is likely. That failed 20-20, picking up support from Republicans Charisse Millett of Anchorage and Eric Feige of Chickaloon.

Once the amendment process wrapped up, the bill pulled from consideration and tabled until Sunday. House Speaker Mike Chenault acknowledged that the outcome would be close.

“You can see it’s kind of a divided issue,” said Chenault after the floor session. “It always is, it always has been.”

Chenault added that final consideration was not being delayed because of any uncertainty over the bill’s ability to pass. The bill was moved so that legislators with scheduled absences could be present for a vote.

Last year, the Department of Health and Social Services introduced regulations that are nearly identical to the bill language, but include the mental health exception. Those regulations are now the subject of a lawsuit, and a judge has put a stay on them until the courts determine if they comply with the equal protection clause of the Alaska Constitution.

If the bill passes, it will be sent to the governor’s desk for his signature, and then, most likely, to the courts.

A virtual life; a too-real death

Thu, 2014-04-10 20:00
A virtual life; a too-real death I never knew Corey Akerelrea, except in the virtual world, and only then after his death. I wish I could bring him back and get to know him better.April 10, 2014

Church overflows with emotion during service for slain 15-year-old Precious Alex

Thu, 2014-04-10 19:58
Church overflows with emotion during service for slain 15-year-old Precious Alex Family and friends crowded the New Hope Baptist Church in Anchorage's Mountain View neighborhood Thursday afternoon for 15-year-old Precious Alex's funeral service. Speakers painted a picture of an affectionate, intelligent girl who was deeply loved.April 10, 2014