On Air

Submit and View KHNS Postings

Please use the following links to submit or view on-air messages :

Submissions must be approved and may be edited for content before appearing on the website or  read on-air.  If you would like a confirmation, please email the station at khns@khns.org. LPs are processed as soon as possible, please allow 3-5 days for process of PSA's . If submitting after 5pm or over the weekend announcements will not be approved until the following weekday.  
 

From Our Listeners

Alaska and Yukon Headlines

Study Shows Military’s Impact On Alaska

Thu, 2013-12-26 18:04

A new study from the state shows how dependent Alaska is on the military.

Download Audio

The Kodiak Daily Mirror reports that 60 percent of all federal dollars spent in Alaska are devoted to defense spending. The state estimates the military will spend $486 million next year on Alaska projects.

The study is from the state Department of Labor and published in this month’s Alaska Economic Trends magazine.

It also shows the Fairbanks North Star Borough has the largest percentage of residents with ties to the military. Just under 23 percent of residents there are employed by the military or a military dependent. Coming in second with nearly 22 percent was the Denali Borough, home to Clear Air Force Station.

Kodiak came in third with 18 percent, mostly Coast Guard members.

Fairbanks Residents Wake Thursday To Minus 41

Thu, 2013-12-26 18:03

If you think minus 38 is cold, just stick around a day.

Download Audio

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reports the low temperature Thursday morning at the airport was minus 41 degrees, three degrees colder than Christmas morning.

The cold Thursday produced the season’s first ice fog, reducing visibility to less than a mile in some places and making the Thursday morning commute a challenge.

And that wasn’t even the coldest temperatures recorded in Alaska. Weather officials say it was minus 58 in Chicken, 52 below in Tok and minus 50 in Eagle.

The National Weather Service says there should be some good news this weekend as warmer air is pushing into the region.

Gambell Carvers Get Ivory To Work With

Thu, 2013-12-26 18:02

On St Lawrence Island, the tribal government of Gambell gave one walrus tusk to each household in the community of just under 800. The distribution is meant to provide ivory carvers with a bit of raw material to work with, in order to bring in a little extra cash amid the ongoing economic disaster from last spring’s poor walrus harvest on St. Lawrence Island.

Download Audio

How Do The Lower 48s Same-Sex Marriage Rulings Affect Alaska?

Thu, 2013-12-26 18:01

Leaders in the state of Utah announced today they will challenge an appeals court ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court. The case involves a Utah state constitutional amendment that outlawed same sex marriage. A federal judge threw out the amendment saying it violated the U.S. constitution’s equal protection and due process clauses. The decision does not have a direct impact on Alaska’s amendment banning same sex marriage, but ACLU Alaska executive Director Joshua Decker says a Nevada case currently in the 9th circuit court of appeals will.

Download Audio

Russian Mission Man Dies In Snowmachine Crash

Thu, 2013-12-26 18:00

A Russian Mission man died on Christmas Day after his snowmachine crashed.

Download Audio

Alaska State Troopers say 35-year-old Jeremy Wigley died in what is believed to be a single-vehicle crash. Wigley’s body was found Wednesday morning on the Russian Mission Lake.

Several hours earlier he had been drinking with his wife and friends. Troopers say Wigley and his wife had been arguing and he allegedly forced her onto his snow machine and drove off.

Just before 5 a.m. his wife showed up at a local home. She wasn’t wearing any shoes and was hypothermic. Troopers say she doesn’t remember the details of what happened before that.

A relative took the woman to the local health clinic then began searching for Wigley. His body was found at about 7:30 a.m.

Sitka Moorage Fee Hike Takes Effect Jan. 1

Thu, 2013-12-26 17:59

Moorage rates in Sitka’s harbors are going up next week.

The Sitka assembly last night approved the rate hike on second reading, bumping the per-foot monthly charge for permanent berths from $2.64 to $2.80, an increase of a little over 6 percent effective New Year’s Day.

Download Audio

The increase was the result of a master plan completed in 2012 that proposes similar increases in each of the next three years.

There was no testimony from harbor users, although some expressed their concern two weeks ago when the issue was heard on first reading. The general sentiment was that some commercial fishermen might start to look for lower moorage in other communities.

Assembly member Mike Reif questioned that logic at the time. But since then, he has become the lone “no” vote. But it wasn’t because he was worried that the rates were too high.

“I think the rate needs to be a little bit higher. I’d rather enter this maybe being a little too high in the beginning, and then we can cut back.”

Reif was concerned about some of the possible scenarios described by the harbor department that involved abandoning some of the harbor system, or allowing parking lots to revert to gravel. He said, “We’re not just trying to take care of current harbor users — we want to take care of their children.”

There was no support on the rest of the assembly for increasing rates above those recommended in the master plan — but they didn’t rule it out in the future.

Matt Hunter wanted to take a look at how things were going in a year. So did Pete Esquiro. He called Sitka’s “one of the best harbor systems” in Alaska.

“To have something as good as we have is going to cost more money. There’s just no way around it. We have a very large industry here in the salmon and seafood industry that means a lot to us financially. And if we do begin to start closing down facilities, and consider that, it will have some detrimental effects to the overall economy of Sitka.”

Esquiro nonetheless voted with the majority in favor of the 6-percent hike

Assembly member Phyllis Hackett was absent.

The increase keeps Sitka in third place among Southeast’s most expensive harbors, behind the two in Juneau, and in Petersburg. Elsewhere in Alaska, Valdez, Kodiak, Seward, and Homer all have more expensive moorage.

Alaska News Nightly: December 26, 2013

Thu, 2013-12-26 17:58

Individual news stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via emailpodcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn.

Download Audio

Alaska Flu Cases Skyrocket In December

The Associated Press

There’s been a sharp increase in the number of flu cases reported to the state.

Army Corps Of Engineers Discuss Deep Water Port Options

Anna McArthur, KNOM – Nome

The Alaska Army Corp of Engineers met with Army corp leaders in Washington D.C. on Monday, to discuss where the Corp will construct a deep draft port in Western Alaska. Three sites on the Seward Peninsula are potential locations for a new deep water port.

Study Shows Military’s Impact On Alaska

The Associated Press

A new study from the state’s labor department shows how dependent Alaska is on the military.

Fairbanks Residents Wake Thursday To Minus 41

The Associated Press

Fairbanks registered an impressive 38 below on Christmas day but dipped even lower today.

Gambell Carvers Get Ivory To Work With

Zachariah Hughes, KNOM – Nome

On St Lawrence Island, the tribal government of Gambell gave one walrus tusk to each household in the community of just under 800. The distribution is meant to provide ivory carvers with a bit of raw material to work with, in order to bring in a little extra cash amid the ongoing economic disaster from last spring’s poor walrus harvest on St. Lawrence Island.

Same-Sex Marriage Ruling’s Effect On Alaska

Lori Townsend, APRN – Anchorage

Leaders in the state of Utah announced today they will challenge an appeals court ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court. The case involves a Utah state constitutional amendment that outlawed same sex marriage. A federal judge threw out the amendment saying it violated the U.S. constitution’s equal protection and due process clauses. The decision does not have a direct impact on Alaska’s amendment banning same sex marriage, but ACLU Alaska executive Director Joshua Decker says a Nevada case currently in the 9th circuit court of appeals will.

Russian Mission Man Dies In Snowmachine Crash

Angela Denning-Barnes, KYUK – Bethel

A Russian Mission man died on Christmas Day after his snow machine crashed. Alaska State Troopers say 35-year-old Jeremy Wigley died in what is believed to be a single-vehicle crash. Wigley’s body was found Wednesday morning on the Russian Mission Lake.

Sitka Moorage Fee Hike Takes Effect Jan. 1

Robert Woolsey, KCAW – Sitka

Moorage rates in Sitka’s harbors are going up next week. The Sitka assembly Tuesday night approved the rate hike on second reading, bumping the per-foot monthly charge for permanent berths from $2.64 to $2.80, an increase of a little over 6 percent.

ANB Harbor Replacement Moves Forward

Rachel Waldholtz, KCAW – Sitka

Work began in November on Sitka’s ANB harbor. The $7.7 million project will demolish all of the existing structures and replace them with new floats and pilings by early spring. But a small invader in the harbor has added a little wrinkle to the usual process.

ANB Harbor Replacement Moves Forward

Thu, 2013-12-26 17:58

In November, work began on Sitka’s ANB harbor. The $7.7 million project will demolish all of the existing structures and replace them with new floats and pilings by early spring. But a small invader in the harbor has added a wrinkle to the usual process.

Download Audio

Workers with the Seattle-based contractor Pacific Pile and Marine are driving piles into the seafloor at ANB Harbor. Sitka City Engineer Dan Tadic watches from the parking lot at ANB Hall.

Contractors with Seattle-based Pacific Pile and Marine set a piling in ANB Habor in mid-December. Photo by Rachel Waldholz, KCAW – Sitka.

“What they’re doing right now, they’ve got the basically the tip of the piling on rock, and they’re starting to drill into the rock,” Tadic says.  ”And every few feet or so they’re using air to blow the cuttings back out of the piling, so it almost looks like the water is boiling.”

The contractors are drilling about 13 feet into rock to set the pilings. They stop occasionally to flush out the cuttings. At those moments, with water bubbling up and cuttings spraying from the top of the piling, it looks like they’ve struck oil.

The contractors will put in over 60 new galvanized-steel pilings, ranging from 12 to 24 inches in diameter. Those will be followed by brand new floats. The work has to be done by March 15, in time for herring season.

But there’s a side story to the project. In 2010, volunteers with Sitka’s Bioblitz survey found a pair of invasive tunicates – small marine invertebrates – in ANB harbor, as well as several other Sitka harbors.

These tunicates aren’t d. vex (Didemnum vexillum), an invasive tunicate that many Sitkans have heard about before — and that is sometimes compared to the creature from the 1950’s horror movie, The Blob. D. vex can grow extremely fast, blanketing and smothering entire ecosystems. It was found in Sitka’s Whiting Harbor in 2010 — and that’s still the only place in Alaska that it’s been found.

The tunicates in ANB harbor are called botrylloides, or harbor star and golden chain tunicates. And they’ve been much better behaved than d. vex – so far.

Marnie Chapman is a biologist at the University of Alaska Southeast.

“We’re interested in watching the botrylloides group,” Chapman says.  ”Because even though at this point there hasn’t been demonstrated massive growth of these, a lot of times what invasives do is they can hang out at very low levels and then all of a sudden something will change about the environment and then they’re able to grow and expand rapidly.”

The concern is that, given the right conditions, the botrylloides in ANB Harbor could suddenly explode, choking out native species. So though the botrylloides have remained fairly contained thus far, officials hope to avoid spreading them further. Because of this, the ANB Harbor project permit requires that all of the material from the harbor be disposed of in a different way than usual.

“A lot of times what happens in Alaska is bits and pieces of harbors get sent all over the place when harbors are decommissioned,” Chapman said. “And so it’s potentially a really effective way of spreading invasive species to really pristine areas in Alaska, to take pieces of harbors and move them somewhere else.”

Instead, the material from ANB harbor will be barged down to Seattle and disposed of on land. The wood will be taken to a landfill. The steel piling will be recycled. And officials hope the process will prevent the harbor’s  invasive stow-aways from hitching a ride to any other Alaskan ports.

NTSB finds pilot error in fatal 2012 Alaska plane crash

Thu, 2013-12-26 13:35
NTSB finds pilot error in fatal 2012 Alaska plane crash The July 2012 accident -- which occurred north of Fairbanks -- involved an aircraft that was part of a touring group that encountered poor weather while en route from Canada. December 26, 2013

Hawaii sinkhole yields evidence of giant tsunami from Alaska

Thu, 2013-12-26 13:29
Hawaii sinkhole yields evidence of giant tsunami from Alaska A mysterious deposit of rocks, coral and seashells in a Hawaii sinkhole led researchers to conjecture a monster wave born more than 2,000 miles away in an Aleutian earthquake.December 26, 2013