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Alaska and Yukon Headlines

Treadwell slams Begich for the company he keeps; Dems call it hypocricy

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:31

The Senate campaign of Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell has issued a series of press releases attacking incumbent Mark Begich for allegedly receiving support from Outside politicians working to lock up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and enact gun control, which both candidates oppose. But the Treadwell campaign was apparently unaware that a listed host for a Treadwell fundraiser in Chicago is one of the Senate’s biggest advocates for those same two issues.

The Treadwell campaign, in a November press release, noted that Sen. Maria Cantwell, a Democrat from Washington state, helped Begich fundraise last summer. And, she sponsored a bill that would bar oil development in the Arctic Refuge. The press release connects the dots this way:  “Senator Begich either has no pull within the Democratic Party or he supports Senator Cantwell’s move to lock up ANWR from future oil exploration.”

What the press release doesn’t say is that Cantwell’s co-sponsor on the ANWR anti-development bill, Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois, is the lead host named on an invitation to a Treadwell fundraiser in Chicago in July. (One of the other hosts, a Harvard Business School friend of Treadwell’s, posted the invitation on the social network LinkedIn.)  Sen. Kirk is also a big supporter of gun control. He was recently the only Republican senator to get an F on the National Rifle Association’s political scorecard. As it happens, the Treadwell campaign issued a press release this week accusing Begich of being in league, indirectly, with people who want to undermine gun rights.

Zack Fields, communications director for the Alaska Democratic Party, says the Treadwell campaign is off base on two fronts.

“It’s hypocritical of Treadwell to wage these attacks when he’s taking money from Mark Kirk, an Illinois senator who has voted for gun control and is an original co-sponsor of legislation to lock up ANWR from oil and gas development forever,” Fields says

And Fields says it’s childish to argue that Alaska senators should only work with colleagues who agree with them on every issue.

Treadwell campaign spokesman Rick Gorka wasn’t with the campaign when the Chicago fundraiser occurred, but he looked into it and says Sen. Kirk did not attend.

“As a courtesy, Sen. Kirk lent his name to be used at an event, and that was the extent of his involvement in this reception,” Gorka says.

Sen. Kirk hasn’t donated to the Treadwell campaign, either directly or through his leadership PAC, according to Gorka. He stands by the accusations the campaign has made against Begich.

The link the campaign has drawn between Begich and gun control is a little fuzzy. It goes like this: Wealthy ex-New York Mayor and gun control fan Michael Bloomberg gave $2.5 million to a political fund called Senate Majority PAC, and the Treadwell campaign maintains that group has aired ads for Begich. “Anti-Second Amendment Billionaire Supporting Mark Begich’s Re-Election Bid” says the Treadwell press release headline. Gorka says his proof is an article in Politico, which reported early this week that the Democratic group has already aired TV spots for a raft of senators, including Begich. But no one seems to know what these pro-Begich ads said or when they ran. Spokesmen for the Begich campaign and the Democratic Party of Alaska say they watch for Begich-related ads and don’t recall seeing any sponsored by Senate Majority PAC.  There’s no sign of the ads on the PAC’s website, either.

Gorka says Politico wasn’t the only news outlet to report that the ads exist.

Treadwell’s press release suggests Bloomberg wants to support Begich. “It’s no secret that Michael Bloomberg wants to undermine the Second Amendment and clearly he sees (Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid) and Mark Begich as allies in his crusade,” the press release says.

Bloomberg, though, has pledged to spend heavily against Begich, according to a May article in the New Republic, because Begich voted against background checks for firearms last year.

The Treadwell press release calls on Begich to reject any further help from Senate Majority PAC, which is dedicated to keeping the Senate under Democratic control and was founded by Reid’s former chief of staff.

“Mark Begich should make it clear to Harry Reid that he does not want the support of a PAC that accepts funding from Mayor Bloomberg,” Gorka said in an email to APRN. “He should do that publicly. “

But that may not be legal. Senate Majority PAC is organized as an “independent expenditure” group. Federal elections rules say candidates are not allowed to coordinate media plans or strategies with such PACs.

Gorka declined to call anything his campaign did a mistake but says Begich committed a bigger one.

“I think there’s a difference between (using Kirk’s name and) Sen. Cantwell coming to Alaska and actively campaigning for Sen.  Begich,” he said.

The Begich campaign says Cantwell, chair of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, came primarily to visit the disaster site at Galena and Native medical facilities. She also headlined two fundraisers for Begich, in Anchorage and Fairbanks.

 

 

Parnell Announces New Pipeline Plan, Changes AGIA Agreement

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:21

Governor Sean Parnell announced Friday the state is taking a new approach to a large-scale natural gas line in Alaska.

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“We have agreed to amicably terminate our involvement with TransCanada under AGIA, but sign up with TransCanada in a more traditional arrangement along with the producers and AGDC [Alaska Gasline Development Corporation],” he said at a presentation before the Alaska Support Industry Alliance in Anchorage.

Parnell did not release the terms of the agreement, but did announce “Transcanada agreed to a debt-equity structure that guarantees Alaska’s interests are protected.”

Parnell explained the Alaska Gasline Inducement Act, which was negotiated under Governor Sarah Palin in 2007, was designed with the idea of one developer moving natural gas. Now the project is more complicated and involves gas treatment and liquification.

The new agreement with TransCanada, Exxon, BP, and ConocoPhillips, which Parnell said will be signed very soon, gives the state ownership. “Ownership ensures we either pay ourselves for project services or at the very least understand, negotiate, and ensure the lowest possible costs.”

Parnell said the state would also receive a share of the profits over the entirety of the project.

Supreme Court Okay’s Referendum Repealing Controversial Labor Law

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:20

The Supreme Court of Alaska has ruled that a referendum launched by union supporters to repeal a controversial Anchorage labor ordinance can go ahead.

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Assembly members and Anchorage Mayor Dan Sullivan heard criticism of the Mayor’s proposed labor union ordinance at a work session held Wednesday at City Hall. Photo by Daysha Eaton, KSKA – Anchorage.

The Justices made their decision in just two days. The referendum allows voters to decide whether the labor ordinance, named the Responsible Labor Act or better known as A0-37 should be repealed. Andy Holleman, with the Anchorage Education Association, says the ruling was no surprise.

“Certainly we didn’t expect it to come back this quick, but I think that speaks to the legal simplicity of the case,” Holleman said. ”This really isn’t something that never should have gone to court. The city had to contrive a case here. The right of people to bring a referendum is pretty clear cut.”

Despite protests, the Assembly passed the labor law last March. The ordinance takes away municipal workers right to strike and restricts collective bargaining rights. It affects more than 2,000 city employees. The administration of Mayor Dan Sullivan has already negotiated a handful of union contracts under the law. Gerard Asselin is with the Anchorage Police Employees Union. He says the Justice’s decision allows labor supporters to begin focusing on the upcoming election.

“It’s pretty exciting that we can move on with what we’re trying to accomplish,” Asselin said. ”At this point we’re preparing to have this on the April ballot, getting kinda things in place to educate those who are going to show up in April to vote on this issue.”

Whether the issue will be on the April Ballot is still up for consideration. Municipal Attorney Dennis Wheeler says he’s disappointed, but not surprised, by the ruling.

Since the introduction of the ordinance, signs expressing support for unions have popped up in Anchorage

“While I always understood that this was a difficult argument to prevail on I thought it was a worthwhile one and we needed that resolved so that next year and the year after when we get more of these referendum on labor issues we have some guidance on how to handle them,” Wheeler said.

Wheeler says the court case cost the municipality around $70000 and labor supporters estimate they’ve spend at least that much. At their next regular meeting on Tuesday, Assembly members will be weighing whether to move the April Election to November, which could delay a vote on the referendum. An opinion from the Supreme Court Justices on the case is forthcoming.

Another court case will decide whether Mayor Sullivan has the power to veto an ordinance that sets an election date for the Referendum. In November he vetoed a decision by the Anchorage Assembly to place the referendum on the April Municipal election ballot.

“I appreciate that this decision was a difficult one to make for the Supreme Court. Their ruling will help provide some certainty in an otherwise murky area of law, and will allow voters to decide on whether fiscal and policy guidance on labor relations should be in the hands of the Municipal Assembly or directed by special interests.” Mayor Sullivan on January 10, 2014 Supreme Court Ruling

Ravn Investigating Cause Of St. Mary’s Crash

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:18

Photo courtesy Alaska State Troopers.

The NTSB is investigating the Era commuter plane that crashed and killed four people and injured six outside St. Mary’s.

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The government’s full report is many months away, but in the meantime, Era, now known as Ravn and others are digging into the cause of the crash.

Witnesses at the airport in St. Mary’s saw the Cessna 208 approaching at a dangerously low altitude and then flying past the runway before it crashed into a tundra ridge.  While the cause is still unknown, weather at the time included rain and fog, conditions that make flying challenging.

The NTSB is not saying what role the weather played or if the wings took on ice, but Ravn CEO Bob Hajdukovich believes the plane was flying within its envelop of safe operation.

“I can with a pretty high level of confidence say that icing was present the day of the accident, but certainly didn’t bring the airplane down,” Hajdukovich said. “We’re not treating this as a Cessna 208 tail stall or icing event.”

The 208 forms a big part of Ravn’s fleet, about a quarter of their aircraft. It’s a workhorse that Hajdukovich believes in. But the aircraft has some history with icing. The NTSB in 2006 released recommendations stating the 208 should not be flown in anything beyond light icing. That’s a recommendation, not a rule.

The manufacturer has made some changes. Cessna has swapped the deicing system on new aircraft, from the inflatable boots – that blow up and knock off ice, to an anti icing system, the TKS weeping wing.  This puts out small amounts of anti-ice fluid on the wing’s leading edge. This should prevent ice from ever forming. Hageland has not retrofitted any of its caravans.

And after the crash, that’s attracted the attention of lawyers, like Ladd Sanger, an attorney with Slack and Davis, a Dallas based firm that works in aviation law. He’s a pilot and has litigated several cases involving the 208.

“The caravan has a very bad track record in ice,” Sanger said. “There was a solution that was possible that would have likely prevented this crash, but unfortunately Cessna and Hageland chose not to employ it on this airplane or other that are operating in areas where icing is not only foreseeable but likely.”

Sanger has been in contact with attorneys working with crash victims.

Hajdukovich says that Cessna’s new anti-ice system is not a silver bullet. Ravn has done research into the TKS system. He says it’s expensive and somewhat problematic here.  He points to causes some corrosion to the wing, plus you have to have the liquid running constantly, which would require refills at small airfields.

“The caravan is very well suited for Bethel and can fly in ice, but you need tight controls in place to make sure you don’t get into heavy ice in the wrong condition with the wrong pilot experience, and you don’t want anything wrong with plane so you don’t want anything deferred,” Hajdukovich said. “There’s a lot of things you can do as a company to help tighten that envelop.”

Going forward, Ravn is sticking with the caravan. And Hajdukovich says the group is taking a hard look at safety.  He says there are some unrelated safety initiatives in play.  The company is looking at putting additional controls in place to elevate discussion of weather in the decision to fly or not.

“We hurt our friends, we hurt our customers, and we hurt ourselves and we want to gain that public trust back,” Hajdukovich said. “While we’re investigating what went wrong, if we’ll ever find out. it was a very traumatic event and we certainly don’t want to minimize the tragedy itself.”

“In terms of moving forward, we always use accidents like this as opportunities to try to find ways to minimize that risk in the future.”

And six weeks after the accident, Ravn’s 208s are moving people, groceries, and necessary supplies all over the delta.  The caravan flies to nearly 40 communities Ravn serves in the region.

No one knows with certainty what happened on Nov. 29. The NTSB says it could be a year before their final report is ready.

Alaska News Nightly: January 10, 2014

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:18

Individual news stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via emailpodcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn.

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Parnell Announces New Pipeline Plan, Changes AGIA Agreement

Anne Hillman, APRN – Anchorage

Governor Sean Parnell announced Friday the state is taking a new approach to a large-scale natural gas line in Alaska.

Supreme Court Okay’s Referendum Repealing Controversial Labor Law

Daysha Eaton, KSKA – Anchorage

The Supreme Court of Alaska has ruled that a referendum launched by union supporters to repeal a controversial Anchorage labor ordinance can go ahead. The Justices made their decision in just two days.

Treadwell Campaign Attacks Begich On ANWR

Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington DC

The Senate campaign of Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell has issued a series of press releases attacking incumbent Mark Begich for allegedly receiving support from Outside politicians working to lock up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and enact gun control, which both candidates oppose. But the Treadwell campaign was apparently unaware that a listed host for a Treadwell fundraiser in Chicago is one of the Senate’s biggest advocates for those same two issues.

Ravn Investigating Cause Of St. Mary’s Crash

Ben Matheson, KYUK – Bethel

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the Era commuter plane that crashed and killed four people and injured six near St. Mary’s in November.  The government’s full report is many months away, but in the meantime, Era, now known as Ravn, and others are digging into the cause of the crash.

Lawmakers File Dozens Of Bills In Advance Of Session

Alexandra Gutierrez, APRN – Juneau

State lawmakers have pre-filed more than 50 bills in advance of the legislative session.

Air Quality Regulations Worry Fairbanks, State Officials

Tim Ellis, KUAC – Fairbanks

The controversial air-quality regulations that state officials have proposed for Fairbanks-area residents are aimed at reducing pollution from wood-burning heating systems. They do not apply to coal-fired systems, which are increasingly popular because coal is cheaper than wood.

Winter Grizzly Sightings Raise Concerns Near Denali Park

Dan Bross, KUAC – Fairbanks

Midwinter grizzly and track sightings have raised concern in the Denali Park area. Local resident, four time Iditarod Champion Jeff King spotted blood and bear tracks on a trail while training dogs Wednesday.

AK: Shipwreck

Annie Ropeik, KUCB – Unalaska

The grounded crab boat Arctic Hunter has been stuck on the rocks outside Unalaska for more than two months now. Dan Magone of Resolve-Magone Marine Services has been working on a plan to remove the wreck. Right now, the Hunter is at the mercy of the elements. So what happens to a shipwreck while it’s waiting to be saved?

300 Villages: Chickaloon

This week, we’re heading to Chickaloon, a small community located along the Glenn Highway, surrounded by mountains and glaciers. Patricia Wade is a member of the Chickaloon tribe.

Air Quality Regulations Worry Fairbanks, State Officials

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:17

The controversial air-quality regulations that state officials have proposed for Fairbanks-area residents are aimed at reducing pollution from wood-burning heating systems. They do not apply to coal-fired systems, which are increasingly popular because coal is cheaper than wood.

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Lawmakers File Dozens Of Bills In Advance Of Session

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:17

State lawmakers have pre-filed more than 50 bills in advance of the legislative session.

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A number of bills deal with civil liberties issues. One would put limits on when and how drones could be used in police investigations. A different item would seal off court records in cases that resulted in a dismissal or not-guilty verdict. There’s also a bill to regulate the practice of students being restrained or put in seclusion over the course of disciplinary action, and another to formalize grievance procedures for people undergoing mental health treatment. One piece of legislation would also bring “Erin’s Law” to Alaska, by requiring schools to run awareness programs to curb sexual abuse and assault.

Lawmakers also introduced a few education bills. The chair of the Senate Education Committee filed legislation that would create a new elementary school reading program. Bills introduced in the House and Senate would repeal the state’s secondary school exit exam. Legislation from the chair of the House Finance subcommittee on education would get rid of the requirement that city and borough governments contribute funding to their school districts.

A trio of Democratic women in the House have introduced a suite of legislation concerning women’s issues. One of their bills would reestablish the Commission on the Status of Women, another would require employers to give their workers break time for breastfeeding, and a third would require employers to offer sick leave and allow that leave to be used in situations involving domestic violence or sexual assault. They’ve also proposed upping the eligibility level for the DenaliKidcare medical assistance program to 200 percent of the poverty line. The Legislature approved an increase to the program, which serves children and pregnant women, in 2010, but Gov. Sean Parnell vetoed the legislation because a fraction of those funds go to abortion-related services.

One constitutional amendment was filed. It would make the office of attorney general an electable position instead of an appointed one.

Only one piece of bipartisan legislation was offered. A mix of four lawmakers from the House majority and minority caucuses has filed legislation that would make the Native languages like Yup’ik and Tlingit official languages for the state. A group of House Democrats and a group of House Republicans separately filed two nearly identical bills that would reject pay raises for the governor and his cabinet.

A couple of quirky items were also introduced. One would allow cocktails to be served on golf courses, in addition to beer and wine, and another would make it so the Department of Revenue doesn’t have to register cattle brands.

The Legislature will gavel in on January 21.

Winter Grizzly Sightings Raise Concerns Near Denali Park

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:16

Midwinter grizzly and track sightings have raised concern in the Denali Park area. Local resident, four time Iditarod Champion Jeff King spotted blood and bear tracks on a trail while training dogs Wednesday.

Download Audio

AK: Shipwreck

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:15

Dan Magone on the deck of the Arctic Hunter, with debris visible on the beach. Photo by Annie Ropeik, KUCB – Unalaska.

The grounded crab boat Arctic Hunter has been stuck on the rocks outside Unalaska for more than two months now. Dan Magone of Resolve-Magone Marine Services has been working on a plan to remove the wreck. Right now, the Hunter is at the mercy of the elements. So what happens to a shipwreck while it’s waiting to be saved?

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It’s easy to miss the Arctic Hunter until you’re almost at its bow.

“Just go right over there, just inside of that – yeah, right straight ahead would be good, I think…,” Dan Magone said.

The 93-foot crab boat is tipped to the side, half-submerged in Unalaska Bay. It looks small at the foot of the cliffs, and its blue hull blends in with the water.

Cevil Magone “You want to be hanging along the port side, there?”
Dan Magone: “Yeah.”

Dan Magone and his son and employee Cecil Magone have taken a skiff out to the Hunter. The wreck is tilting toward us where we’re anchored, and we can see it listing back and forth.

Dan Magone snorkeling in front of the Arctic Hunter. Photo by Annie Ropeik, KUCB – Unalaska.

The Hunter has been stuck here a lot longer than your typical wreck, since November 1st. But it’s jammed into the rocks pretty securely, and all of its fuel either spilled just after the grounding, or has since been removed. It’s not an environmental hazard anymore.

So the boat’s insurance company is taking its time getting the wreck removal started. It’s not going to be an easy job, and there aren’t many breaks in the weather on this part of the coastline.

The delay has given Dan Magone more time to fine-tune his wreck removal proposal. Today is the last planning trip he’s going to make.

“Well, we’re doing a dive survey of the Arctic Hunter,” Dan said. “Principally, I’m checking out the rocks that I may have to bust with explosives in order to pull the wreckage out of here.”

After months of pounding by waves and wind, the Hunter can’t float on its own. Salvagers will need to clear a path in the rocks and drag it out to deeper water before they can work on it.

It’s raining and windy today – typical weather for Unalaska Bay, and for Dan, time to go snorkeling. He straps on a wetsuit, fins and mask and dives into what’s probably 40-degree water to swim out to the boat.

Dan Magone and his sea urchins in the skiff after the survey dive. Photo by Annie Ropeik, KUCB – Unalaska.

From where the skiff stays anchored, we can see that the Arctic Hunter has taken a beating. There’s no glass left in most of its cabin windows, and the window frames are crunched in and starting to rust.

Cecil says that’s pretty typical with a wreck that’s been out here so long.

“On a rock beach like this?” Cecil said. “They just sit there and work, you know. Every wave that hits it grinds it into the rock a little more.”

And anything that’s not tied down is likely to wash out. Dan finds huge wrenches in the water next to the Hunter as he snorkels around.

“Nice one, two and a half… Those are expensive,” Dan said.

He brings them back to the side of the skiff and tosses them in.

“Treasure!” Dan exclaimed as he tosses the wrench in the skiff.

Cecil says these wrenches probably fell out of the engine room. They’d sink or wash ashore if Dan didn’t collect them. More things are already visible on the rocky beach behind the Hunter – like plywood and insulation from the boat’s interior, plus smaller objects.

Photo by Annie Ropeik, KUCB – Unalaska.

“Buoys, fishing gear, survival suits, probably a couple bottles of bleach or something,” Cecil said. “You know, just – if you had a doublewide trailer that got hit by a tornado, the kind of stuff you’d find in there is on that beach right now. DVDs, somebody’s socks, all that stuff.”

At least what we can see of the hull is intact. But Cecil says it’s a different story below the waterline.

“Think about, like, a soda can, maybe. If you took a soda can and just raked it back and forth real violently on one of these pieces of lava rock, the top might not be all crunched up super bad, it’d have a little bit of damage, but where it was rubbing on the bottom, you know, it’d just be shredded out, and kind of, like, in ribbons, you know,” Cecil said. “The steel bottom of this boat’s in ribbons where it’s touching the bottom.”

Cecil says salvagers will have to get the boat off the rocks and patch it up to float it again. Then they can take it to somewhere like a dry dock. But Cecil isn’t optimistic much of the Hunter will be saved.

“This thing’s going to be so mangled that you’re pretty much – anywhere you take it, you’re probably just going to have to cut it up into smaller pieces,” Cecil said.

For now, the survey work is done. Dan surfaces at the side of the skiff and climbs back in.

“Invigorating,” Dan said.

And he’s brought lunch.

Ropeik: “What’d you bring, there, urchins?”
Dan: “Sea urchins.”
Ropeik:: “For eating?”
Dan: “They’re for eating, yeah.”

He cuts them open and we snack on them as we head away from the Hunter.

Cecil: “Did you see rocks when you looked in the fish hold?”
Dan: “Yeah. Rocks live there now.”

The Arctic Hunter is becoming part of the landscape out here. Like the rocks that have taken root in its hold, it’s taken root against the beach. The wreck will only break down and blend in more the longer it waits.

300 Villages: Chickaloon

Fri, 2014-01-10 18:14

This week, we’re heading to Chickaloon, a small community located along the Glenn Highway, surrounded by mountains and glaciers. Patricia Wade is a member of the Chickaloon tribe.

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Driver Injured After Semi-Truck Strikes Bus Carrying Kenai Skiers

Fri, 2014-01-10 17:43

A high school cross-country ski team is okay after its bus was struck by a semi-truck on the Richardson Highway on Friday morning.

Valdez Police say the accident involving the Kenai Central High School cross-country ski team happened at mile 55 of the Richardson Highway at 11:30 a.m.

The bus driver sustained serious injuries.  No serious injuries were reported for the 49 students on board.

The team was heading to Valdez for this weekend’s Valdez Invitational Meet.

The Valdez School District has sent buses to the scene and is transporting the students to Valdez.

Assembly Weighs Election Date Change

Fri, 2014-01-10 17:38

Image by Josh Edge, APRN – Anchorage.

An Anchorage Assembly member wants to move the Municipal Election from spring to fall. He says he believes it will boost turnout, which has averaged around 29 percent since 1993, but other Assembly members says it’s a bad idea and want the public to weigh in before any change is made.

Anchorage Assembly member Chris Birch is proposing an ordinance that would change the municipal election from April to November to coincide with state and federal elections. He says turnout is more than double for state elections in November.

Article by the Anchorage Times.

“So the objective is to move the election to a time when people actually show up to vote,” Birch said.

Birch says the one year when issues were put on the November ballot there was a sharp increase in turnout.

“The high point really is an election that happened in 2004 when we contracted with the state to run a school bond election, two school bonds, they passed and we had a 52 percent turnout,” Birch said. ”And that’s basically what spurred my interest in seeing a dramatic increase, a doubling if you will of municipal voter turnout.”

Twice before, the election has been moved. In 2000 the election was moved from the third to the first Tuesday in April. In 1988 the election moved from October to April. The rational was the same as moving it to the fall today, higher voter turnout. And the concerns were the same: the ethical impacts of sitting Assembly members extending their own terms and the Mayor’s. They solved that problems by delaying the effective date for three years.

Assembly member Elvi Gray-Jackson says increasing voter turnout is a great idea, but there’ no rush. Municipal Attorneys says it would be legal, although it would increase the terms of sitting assembly members by seven months. Gray-Jackson along with Assembly members Dick Traini and Tim Steel have a counter proposal.

“The proposal that Mr. Traini, Mr. Steel and I have brought forward is to instead of the Assembly making a decision whether or not to move the election from April to November, letting the voters decide when they want to vote,” Gray-Jackson said.

Gray Jackson says Assembly members extending their own terms creates a conflict of interest. Assembly member Birch has served on the Assembly for three consecutive terms equaling nine years. This is his final term. Gray-Jackson says that makes his proposal problematic.

“If I were Mr. Birch, whose term is over April 1st I would feel so uncomfortable bringing forward this ordinance right now,” Gray-Jackson said. ”If he really were concerned about voter turnout, why didn’t he do it during the nine-year period that he was on the Assembly.”

But Birch says he believes it’s fine for him to extend his term since every other Assembly member and the Mayor would also get their terms extended.

Birch: “It would extend my term and every other member’s term on the body. It affects every member on the body uniformly.”
Daysha: “But you’re the only member who’s terming out, right?”
Birch: “Yeah, that’s right.”

Besides increasing voter turnout, holding elections in November could save money, Birch says, because the state and municipality could share resources such as election workers and voting machines. Birch and the Officials with the Clerk’s office have talked with Gail Fenumiai, the Director of the Alaska Division of Elections. She says it’s possible.

“We just talked about whether or not that could happen and we’ve come to the conclusion that it could,” Fenumiai said. ”You know it’s still very early – a little premature to get into any details. There’s still a lot of work that the Anchorage folks need to do on their end to see if that’s even going to become a reality for them.”

Officials with the Clerk’s office say the initial change would require an investment. The seven-month extension will also apply to Mayor Dan Sullivan’s term.

Birch’s ordinance seeking to change elections from April to November will be up for public testimony at the Tuesday, Nov. 14 Assembly meeting along with the ordinances offered by Assembly members proposing the issue go before voters.

Book review: 'The Invention of Wings'

Fri, 2014-01-10 17:09
Book review: 'The Invention of Wings' "The Secret Life of Bees" author Sue Monk Kidd weaves her own narrative into the real-life story of abolitionist Sarah Grimké.January 10, 2014

Iron Dog

Fri, 2014-01-10 16:45

HOST: Charles Wohlforth

GUESTS:  TBA

PARTICIPATE: Facebook: Outdoor Explorer (comments may be read on-air)

BROADCAST: Thursday February 20, 2013. 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm AKT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Thursday February 20, 2013. 9:00 – 10:00 pm AKT

SUBSCRIBE: Receive Outdoor Explorer automatically every week via

Go to OUTDOOREXPLORER.ORG

Audio will be posted following radio broadcast

Alaska Mountain Rescue

Fri, 2014-01-10 16:45

HOST: Charles Wohlforth

GUESTS:  TBA

PARTICIPATE: Facebook: Outdoor Explorer (comments may be read on-air)

BROADCAST: Thursday February 13, 2013. 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm AKT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Thursday February 13, 2013. 9:00 – 10:00 pm AKT

SUBSCRIBE: Receive Outdoor Explorer automatically every week via

Go to OUTDOOREXPLORER.ORG

Audio will be posted following radio broadcast

Olympic Parents

Fri, 2014-01-10 16:44

HOST: Charles Wohlforth

GUESTS:  TBA

PARTICIPATE: Facebook: Outdoor Explorer (comments may be read on-air)

BROADCAST: Thursday February 6, 2013. 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm AKT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Thursday February 6, 2013. 9:00 – 10:00 pm AKT

SUBSCRIBE: Receive Outdoor Explorer automatically every week via

Go to OUTDOOREXPLORER.ORG

Audio will be posted following radio broadcast

Fairbanks man charged after crashing stolen truck, causing life-threatening injuries

Fri, 2014-01-10 16:06
Fairbanks man charged after crashing stolen truck, causing life-threatening injuries Fairbanks man received multiple charges after causing a three car accident that left one with life threatening injuries, Thursday afternoon.January 10, 2014

Supreme Court Okay’s Referendum Repealing Controversial Labor Law

Fri, 2014-01-10 16:01

The Supreme Court of Alaska has ruled that a referendum launched by union supporters to repeal a controversial Anchorage labor ordinance can go ahead.
The Justices made their decision in just two days. The referendum allows voters to decide whether the labor ordinance, named the Responsible Labor Act or better known as A0-37 should be repealed. Andy Holleman, with the Anchorage Education Association, says the ruling was no surprise.

“Certainly we didn’t expect it to come back this quick, but I think that speaks to the legal simplicity of the case. This really isn’t something that never should have gone to court. The city had to contrive a case here. The right of people to bring a referendum is pretty clear cut.”

Despite protests, the Assembly passed the labor law last March. The ordinance takes away municipal workers right to strike and restricts collective bargaining rights. It affects more than 2-thousand city employees. The administration of Mayor Dan Sullivan has already negotiated a handful of union contracts under the law. Gerard Asselin is with the Anchorage Police Employees Union. He says the Justice’s decision allows labor supporters to begin focusing on the upcoming election.

“It’s pretty exciting that we can move on with what we’re trying to accomplish. At this point we’re preparing to have this on the April ballot, getting kinda things in place to educate those who are going to show up in April to vote on this issue.”

Whether the issue will be on the April Ballot is still up for consideration. Municipal Attorney Dennis Wheeler says he’s disappointed but not surprised by the ruling.

“While I always understood that this was a difficult argument to prevail on I thought it was a worthwhile one and we needed that resolved so that next year and the year after when we get more of these referendum on labor issues we have some guidance on how to handle them.”

Wheeler says the court case cost the municipality around 70-thousand dollars and Labor supporters estimate they’ve spend at least that much. At their next regular meeting on Tuesday, Assembly members will be weighing whether to move the April Election to November, which could delay a vote on the referendum. An opinion from the Supreme Court Justices on the case is forthcoming.
Another court case will decide whether Mayor Sullivan has the power to veto an ordinance that sets an election date for the Referendum. In November he vetoed a decision by the Anchorage Assembly to place the referendum on the April Municipal election ballot.

Community Skating

Fri, 2014-01-10 16:00

Here’s an Alaska moment. It’s a weekend afternoon, you’ve been stuck indoors all day, you see that beautiful winter light in the sky, and you say, ‘let’s go skating.’ Half an hour later, you’re gliding over a frozen pond with your neighbors, getting rosy cheeks, and looking forward to hot chocolate. We’re talking about ice skating, the casual community kind, where everyone can participate and enjoy a winter day with friends.

HOST: Charles Wohlforth

GUESTS:  

  • Edwin Blair, Anchorage Skate Club, Alpine Services
  • Jim Renkert, Anchorage Skates, Alaska Speedskating Club

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BROADCAST: Thursday January 16, 2013. 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm AKT

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Complaint evolves into suit against council

Fri, 2014-01-10 15:55
A Whitehorse woman is suing the Yukon Medical Council for what she alleges is discrimination.